Showing posts with label Bubblegum. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Bubblegum. Show all posts

Nov 21, 2019

Gimme Dat Ding by Tony Burrows (1970)

Gimme Dat Ding by Tony Burrows (1970)
"Gimme Dat Ding" is a 1970 popular UK song, of the novelty type, sung by "one-hit wonder" The Pipkins, and written and composed by Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood. Released as a single, it is the title selection of an album which The Pipkins recorded and released on the EMI Columbia Records label. The song also appeared on the compilation of the same name, which The Pipkins shared with another up-and-coming UK group The Sweet.



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Aug 4, 2019

The Tennessee Waltz by Patti Page (1950)

The Tennessee Waltz by Patti Page (1950)
"Tennessee Waltz" is a popular country music song with lyrics by Redd Stewart and music by Pee Wee King written in 1946 and first released in January 1948. The song became a multimillion seller via a 1950 recording – as "The Tennessee Waltz" – by Patti Page. As of 1974, it was the biggest-selling song ever in Japan.



Jul 14, 2019

Pleasant Valley Sunday by The Monkees (1967)

Pleasant Valley Sunday by The Monkees (1967)
"Pleasant Valley Sunday" is a song by Gerry Goffin and Carole King, most famous for the version recorded by the Monkees in 1967. Goffin's and King's inspiration for the name was a street named Pleasant Valley Way, in West Orange, New Jersey where they were living at the time. The road follows a valley through several communities among the Watchung Mountains. The lyrics were a social commentary on status symbols, creature comforts, life in suburbia and "keeping up with the Joneses". It became one of the Monkees' most successful singles.


Jul 12, 2019

I Think We're Alone Now by Tommy James and the Shondells (1967)

I Think We're Alone Now by Tommy James and the Shondells (1967)
"I Think We're Alone Now" is a song written and composed by Ritchie Cordell that was the title selection from a same-named album released by the American recording artists Tommy James and the Shondells. "I Think We're Alone Now" was a 1967 US hit for James and the Shondells, reaching number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song has since been covered several times by other artists.

Jul 10, 2019

The Rain, The Park & Other Things by The Cowsills (1967)

The Rain, The Park & Other Things by The Cowsills (1967)
"The Rain, the Park & Other Things" is a psychedelic pop song with music and lyrics co-written by Artie Kornfeld and Steve Duboff. It was recorded by the pop band The Cowsills, and included on their 1967 album The Cowsills. Released as a single, the song reached #2 on the Billboard charts. It was kept from the #1 spot by Daydream Believer by The Monkees. The single cemented the group's international popularity and sold some three million copies over the years. It ties with 1969's "Hair" as the group's biggest hit, as both reached #2 in the U.S. It reached #1 in Canada's RPM Magazine charts.

Jul 1, 2019

Simon Says by 1910 Fruitgum Company (1967)

Simon Says by 1910 Fruitgum Company (1967)
"Simon Says" is a bubblegum pop song written by Elliot Chiprut and originally recorded, in 1967, by the 1910 Fruitgum Company, becoming their most successful chart hit.

The song was based on the children's game "Simon says." Produced by Jerry Kasenetz, Jeffry Katz, and Chiprut, the single was issued by Buddah Records and entered the U.S. Hot 100 in January 1968, rising to #4 on the chart. It was also a hit in the UK, where it reached #2 on the singles chart.


Jun 30, 2019

Sweet Pea by Tommy Roe (1966)

Sweet Pea by Tommy Roe (1966)
"Sweet Pea" is a song written and performed by Tommy Roe. It reached number 1 in Canada, number 1 in New Zealand, number 7 in Australia, and number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1966. It was featured on his 1966 album, Sweet Pea. The song was ranked number 44 on Billboard magazine's Top Hot 100 songs of 1966.


Dec 25, 2017

1910 Fruitgum Company (Music Group Biography)


1910 Fruitgum Company (Music Group Biography)
The prototypical bubblegum group, the 1910 Fruitgum Company was the brainchild of Buddah Records house producers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeff Katz, also the masterminds behind such phenoms as the Ohio Express and the Music Explosion. The Kasenetz-Katz formula was a simple one: they enlisted anonymous studio musicians (in this case, vocalists Mark Gutkowski and Joey Levine -- also the singer in the Ohio Express -- along with guitarists Frank Jeckell, Pat Karwan, and Chuck Travis, horn player Larry Ripley, and drummers Rusty Oppenheimer and Floyd Marcus), and prolifically recorded lightweight, fluffy pop songs which found an eager audience in fans looking for an alternative to the edgier rock music of the late '60s. With the 1910 Fruitgum Company, the Kasenetz-Katz team scored their first major hit, the 1968 Top Five smash "Simon Says," launching the bubblegum craze; that same year they also scored with the singles "1, 2, 3 Red Light" and "Goody Goody Gumdrops," all three issued as title tracks from the group's first trio of LPs. 1969's "Indian Giver," the title cut from the Fruitgum Company's fourth album, was their last Top Five hit, and after one last LP, Hard Ride, the group disbanded; some of its members later resurfaced in the Kasenetz-Katz Singing Orchestral Circus.

Jul 7, 2016

Shaun Cassidy - Da Doo Ron Ron from the album Shaun Cassidy (1977)


Shaun Cassidy - Da Doo Ron Ron from the album Shaun Cassidy (1977)

Shaun Cassidy

Shaun Cassidy — Da Doo Ron Ron

02:47314314 kbps6.41 MB

"Da Doo Ron Ron" is a song written by Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich and Phil Spector. It first became a popular top five hit single for the American girl group the Crystals in 1963. American teen idol Shaun Cassidy covered the song in 1977 and his version hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. There have also been many other cover versions of this song, including a version by the Raindrops, which featured the original songwriters of "Da Doo Ron Ron" Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich.

"Da Doo Ron Ron" was covered in 1977 by teen idol Shaun Cassidy on his first solo LP, Shaun Cassidy, launching his career. His version was produced by Michael Lloyd and issued on Warner. It peaked at number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. (The words were changed slightly to make it a boy-girl song, after The Searchers' cover version.) The song was his first of three consecutive Top 10 U.S. hits. Cassidy's cover of "Da Doo Ron Ron" spent 22 weeks on the chart. It became a gold record, as did all of Cassidy's first three single releases.

Apr 28, 2016

Tommy James & the Shondells - Hanky Panky from the album Hanky Panky (1966)

Tommy James & the Shondells - Hanky Panky from the album Hanky Panky (1966)
"Hanky Panky" is a song written by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich for their group, The Raindrops. It was famously remade by rock group Tommy James and the Shondells, who took it to No. 1 in the United States in 1966.

This was Casey Kasem's 'anatomy of a hit' for "Hanky Panky" by Tommy James & The Shondells, with credit provided to a Pittsburgh disk jockey from WZUM, as related during the June 9, 1984 AT40 show.




"...Now we're up to an AT40 extra -- a delayed action, number one song recorded by a group of school boys whose leader was only 13 years old. Here's the story. In 1961, they recorded a rock & roll song when they were going to Niles High School in Niles, Michigan. A small local label released it, but it flopped. Four and a half years later in 1965, the leader of that band -- a boy named Tommy -- was married and supporting his new family by playing clubs around Chicago. Then one day Tommy gets a phone call, a long distance phone call, from a stranger, a disk jockey who says, 'Hey! You better come to Pittsburgh -- your record's number one here.' And Tommy says, 'What record?' Well the man tells him, 'Hanky Panky.' Tommy couldn't believe it. What had happened was that that Pittsburgh disk jockey -- Mike Metrovich on station WZUM -- had found a copy of the record and played it as an oldie. His audience liked it and he kept playing it. And it became the number one song in Pittsburgh. That's when he phoned Tommy James. Well, the other members of Tommy's band wouldn't go to Pittsburgh with him to exploit their hit. So, Tommy went alone. And sold the rights to 'Hanky Panky' to Roulette Records. Now Tommy was gonna to need a band to back him up on all the bookings the hit would generate. And he found one, in a Pittsburgh night club. And they began touring together as Tommy James and The Shondells, while 'Hanky Panky,' promoted by Roulette, began hitting in the rest of the country. And by mid-summer of 1966, it was the number one song in the nation. During the next four years, Tommy James and The Shondells put eighteen more hits on the charts, seven of those in the Top 10. After which, Tommy James added thirteen more chart records as a solo act. Now, as an AT40 extra, here's the song that started it all, recorded when Tommy was 13 years old. Five years later, it was the number one song in the country --'Hanky Panky'..."

Apr 19, 2016

Middle Of The Road - Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep (1971) from the album The Best Of Middle Of The Road

Middle Of The Road - Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep (1971) from the album The Best Of Middle Of The Road
"Chirpy Chirpy Cheep Cheep" is a song recorded in early 1971 by its composer Lally Stott, and made popular later that year by Scottish band Middle of the Road for whom it was a UK number one chart hit. That version is one of the fewer than forty all-time singles to have sold in excess of 10 million physical copies worldwide. Despite its popularity when originally released, the song is rarely played on oldies radio stations today.



The original recording by its composer Lally Stott, was a hit in France (Top 15), a minor hit in Italy, Australia and in the United States. Stott's record company, Philips, was reluctant to release the song overseas, and apparently offered it to two other groups: Scottish folk-pop group Middle of the Road, who were working in Italy at the time, and Mac and Katie Kissoon. While it is unclear which group Stott offered his song to first, Mac and Katie Kissoon produced their cover version first. Middle of the Road's version then initially became a hit on the Continent only, but later grew in popularity in the United Kingdom, reportedly via DJ Tony Blackburn favoring this version over the previously-produced version by Mac and Katie Kissoon. However, Middle of the Road's version didn't even chart on the United States Billboard Hot 100, and nearly flopped in the UK also, because it followed the Kissoon's previously-produced version. Middle of the Road's version eventually reached #1 in the UK and stayed there for five weeks in June 1971, while the Kissoons' version only reached #41. In the USA the Kissoon's version was a greater success, reaching #20 on the Billboard Hot 100, while Lally Stott's original version reached #92.

Oct 13, 2015

Paper Lace - The Night Chicago Died (1974)

Paper Lace - The Night Chicago Died (1974)
"The Night Chicago Died" is a song by the British group Paper Lace, written by Peter Callander and Mitch Murray. The song reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for one week in 1974, reached number 3 in the UK charts, and number 2 in Canada. It is about a fictional shoot-out between the Chicago Police and members of the Al Capone Syndicate. The narrator retells his mother's anguish while awaiting news of the fate of her husband, a Chicago policeman.


Dec 21, 2014

Edison Lighthouse - Love Grows Where My Rosemary Goes (1970)


Edison Lighthouse - Love Grows Where My Rosemary Goes on WLCY Radio
"Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)" is a popular song by "one-hit wonder" Edison Lighthouse. The single hit the number one spot on the UK Singles Chart on the week ending on 31 January 1970, where it remained for a total of five weeks. It also became the first number one single of the 1970s (not counting Rolf Harris' "Two Little Boys" which was a holdover from 1969).




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"Love Grows (Where My Rosemary Goes)" was written by Tony Macaulay and Barry Mason. Essentially, they were a studio group with prolific session singer Tony Burrows providing the vocals. When the song became a hit, a group needed to be assembled rapidly to feature the song on Top of the Pops, a popular TV show. Mason and Macaulay found a group called 'Greenfield Hammer' and brought them to Tony's auditions a week before their appearance on Top of the Pops. Once chosen and rehearsed, they appeared on the show as 'Edison Lighthouse' to mime to the fastest climbing number 1 hit record in history. Burrows sang the song on the programme during his third appearance on the same show with three different groups.

"Love Grows" reached number 5 on US pop chart, number 3 in Canada, and number 1 on the UK Singles Chart for five weeks in January and February 1970. It reached number 3 in South Africa in February 1970