Showing posts with label Soul/R&B. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Soul/R&B. Show all posts

Nov 25, 2019

Ball Of Confusion (That's What The World Is Today) by The Temptations (1970)

Ball Of Confusion (That's What The World Is Today) by The Temptations (1970)
"Ball of Confusion (That's What the World Is Today)" is a 1970 hit single for The Temptations. It was released on the Gordy (Motown) label, and written by Norman Whitfield and Barrett Strong.

The song was used to anchor the 1970 Greatest Hits II LP. It reached #3 on the US pop charts and #2 on the US R&B charts. Billboard ranked the record as the #24 song of 1970.



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Nov 21, 2019

Gimme Dat Ding by Tony Burrows (1970)

Gimme Dat Ding by Tony Burrows (1970)
"Gimme Dat Ding" is a 1970 popular UK song, of the novelty type, sung by "one-hit wonder" The Pipkins, and written and composed by Albert Hammond and Mike Hazlewood. Released as a single, it is the title selection of an album which The Pipkins recorded and released on the EMI Columbia Records label. The song also appeared on the compilation of the same name, which The Pipkins shared with another up-and-coming UK group The Sweet.



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Oct 27, 2019

O-o-h Child by The Five Stairsteps (1970)

O-o-h Child by The Five Stairsteps (1970)
"O-o-h Child" is a 1970 single recorded by Chicago soul family group the Five Stairsteps and released on the Buddah label. The Five Stairsteps had previous peripheral success recording in Chicago with Curtis Mayfield; when Mayfield's workload precluded his continuing to work with the group they were reassigned to Stan Vincent, an in-house producer for Buddah Records, who had recently scored a Top Ten hit with the Lou Christie single "I'm Gonna Make You Mine".



It's A Shame by The Spinners (1970)

It's A Shame by The Spinners (1970)
"It's a Shame" is a song co-written by Stevie Wonder, Syreeta Wright and Lee Garrett and produced by Wonder as a single for The Spinners on Motown's V.I.P. Records label. The single became the Detroit-reared group's biggest single on the Motown Records company since they had signed with the company in 1964 and also their biggest hit in a decade.



Oct 22, 2019

The Shoop Shoop Song (It's In His Kiss) by Betty Everett (1963)

The Shoop Shoop Song (It's In His Kiss) by Betty Everett (1963)
"The Shoop Shoop Song (It's in His Kiss)" is a song written and composed by Rudy Clark. It was first released as a single in 1963 by Merry Clayton that did not chart. The song was made a hit a year later when recorded by Betty Everett, who hit No. 1 on the Cashbox magazine R&B charts with it in 1964.



Oct 20, 2019

Part-Time Lover by Stevie Wonder (1985)

Part-Time Lover by Stevie Wonder
"Part-Time Lover" is a single by Stevie Wonder, from his 1985 album In Square Circle. The song reached number 1 on the Billboard Hot 100, R&B, dance, and adult contemporary charts. The song's simultaneous chart successes made Wonder the first artist to score a number-one hit on four different Billboard charts.



Oct 17, 2019

Nightshift by The Commodores (1985)

Nightshift by The Commodores (1985)
"Nightshift" is a 1985 song by the Commodores and the title track from their eleventh album of the same name. The song was written by lead singer Walter Orange in collaboration with Dennis Lambert and Franne Golde, as a loving tribute to soul/R&B singers Jackie Wilson and Marvin Gaye, both of whom died in 1984. The single was released on January 31, 1985 in the United States.



Oct 6, 2019

Come to Me by France Joli (1979)

Come to Me by France Joli (1979)
"Come to Me" is a #1 disco hit from 1979 performed by France Joli, who had recorded it at the age of fifteen with producer, Tony Green, who composed the song and briefly sings on it. The track also features the famed Philadelphia session vocalists, The Sweethearts of Sigma Sound. The song was introduced on the 1979 album France Joli, which was released in the US on 17 April 1979 on Prelude, and rose to #26.



Sep 10, 2019

At My Front Door by The El Dorados (1955)

At My Front Door by The El Dorados (1955)
"At My Front Door" is a song written by Ewart Abner and John Moore and performed by The El Dorados. It reached #1 on the U.S. R&B chart and #17 on the U.S. pop chart in 1955. The song was featured on their 1957 album, Crazy Little Mama.


Sep 3, 2019

Dead Giveaway by Shalamar (1983)

Dead Giveaway by Shalamar (1983)
Listen to Dead Giveaway by Shalamar. Join WLCY Radio Hits and play your favorite music offline.



Aug 31, 2019

He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother by The Hollies (1969)

He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother by The Hollies (1969)
"He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother" is a ballad written by Bobby Scott and Bob Russell. Originally recorded by Kelly Gordon in 1969, the song became a worldwide hit for The Hollies later that year and again for Neil Diamond in 1970. The Hollies' recording, which featured Elton John on piano, was released in the UK on 1 September 1969 and on 1 December 1969 in the US. It reached No. 3 in the UK and No. 7 in the US.






In 1884, James Wells, Moderator of the United Free Church of Scotland, in his book The Parables of Jesus tells the story of a little girl carrying a big baby boy. Seeing her struggling, someone asked if she wasn't tired. With surprise she replied: "No, he's not heavy; he's my brother."

In a 1918 publication by Ralph Waldo Trine titled The Higher Powers of Mind and Spirit, he relates the following anecdote: "Do you know that incident in connection with the little Scottish girl? She was trudging along, carrying as best she could a boy younger, but it seemed almost as big as she herself, when one remarked to her how heavy he must be for her to carry, when instantly came the reply: 'He's na heavy. He's mi brither.'"

The first editor of Kiwanis magazine, Roe Fulkerson, published a column in September 1924 carrying the title "He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother", the first use of the phrase exactly as it is rendered in the song title.

In the 1940s, the words, adapted as "He ain't heavy, Father, he's my brother", were taken as a slogan for Boys Town children's home by founder Father Edward Flanagan.

Aug 18, 2019

Get on up and Get Away by The Esquires (1967)

Get on up and Get Away by The Esquires (1967)
"Get on Up" is a song written by Johnny Taylor, Gilbert Moorer, and Bill Sheppard and performed by The Esquires. It reached #3 on the US R&B chart and #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967. The song was featured on their 1967 album, Get on Up and Get Away.


Aug 15, 2019

Solid by Ashford and Simpson (1984-85)

Solid by Ashford and Simpson (1984-85)
"Solid" is a song recorded by husband-and-wife songwriting duo Ashford & Simpson. It was featured on their album Solid (1984), and released as a single in November of that year.



Aug 10, 2019

Lady Marmalade by Patti LaBelle (1974)

Lady Marmalade by Patti LaBelle (1974)
"Lady Marmalade" is a song written by Bob Crewe and Kenny Nolan. The song is famous for its sexually suggestive chorus of "Voulez-vous coucher avec moi (ce soir)?", which translates into English as "Do you want to sleep with me (tonight)?". The song first became a popular hit when it was recorded in 1974 by the American girl group Labelle. Labelle held the number-one spot on the Billboard Hot 100 chart for one week, and also topped the Canadian RPM national singles chart.


That Girl by Stevie Wonder (1982)

That Girl by Stevie Wonder (1982)
"That Girl" is a song by American R&B singer and songwriter Stevie Wonder. The song was the leading single from Wonder's album-era 1982 greatest-hits compilation, Stevie Wonder's Original Musiquarium I, as one of four newer songs from the collection. The song spent nine weeks at number one on the Billboard R&B singles chart and reached number four on the Billboard Hot 100.


Aug 9, 2019

The Boll Weevil Song by Brook Benton (1961)

The Boll Weevil Song by Brook Benton (1961)
"Boll Weevil" is a traditional blues song, also known by similar titles such as "Boweavil" or "Boll Weevil Blues". Many songs about the boll weevil were recorded by blues musicians during the 1920s through the 1940s. However, a rendition by Lead Belly recorded in 1934 by folklorist Alan Lomax led to its becoming well-known. A 1961 adaptation by Brook Benton became a pop hit, reaching number two on the Billboard Hot 100.




Perhaps as early as 1908, blues pioneer Charley Patton wrote a song called "Mississippi Boweevil Blues" and recorded it in July 1929 (as "The Masked Marvel") for Paramount Records. Some of the lyrics are similar to "Boll Weevil," describing the first time and "the next time" the narrator saw the boll weevil and making reference to the weevil's family and home. "Mother of the Blues" Ma Rainey recorded a song called "Bo-Weavil Blues" in Chicago in December 1923, and Bessie Smith covered it in 1924, but the song had little in common with Lead Belly's "Boll Weevil" aside from the subject matter.

Aug 6, 2019

Speedo by The Cadillacs (1955)

Speedo by The Cadillacs (1955)
"Speedoo" is a song written by Esther Navarro and performed by The Cadillacs featuring the Jesse Powell Orchestra. It reached #3 on the U.S. R&B chart and #17 on the U.S. pop chart in 1955. The song was featured on their 1957 album, The Fabulous Cadillacs.


Aug 5, 2019

Crying in the Chapel by The Orioles (1953)

Crying in the Chapel by The Orioles (1953)
"Crying in the Chapel" is a song written by Artie Glenn for his son Darrell to sing. Darrell recorded it while still in high school in 1953, along with Artie's band the Rhythm Riders. The song was rejected by Hill and Range Songs and Acuff-Rose Music.

The black R&B group, The Orioles, recorded a cover version of the song which became a major success in 1953. The Orioles' version went to number one on the R&B chart and number eleven on the pop chart. It was included on the soundtrack album for the film American Graffiti.


Aug 4, 2019

No More Doggin' by Rosco Gordon (1952)

No More Doggin' by Rosco Gordon (1952)
Listen to No More Doggin' by Rosco Gordon. Join WLCY Radio Hits and play your favorite music offline.


I'm in the Mood by John Lee Hooker (1951)

I'm in the Mood  by John Lee Hooker (1951)
The Healer is a blues album by John Lee Hooker, released in 1989. The album features collaborations with Bonnie Raitt, Charlie Musselwhite, Los Lobos and Carlos Santana, among others. The Healer peaked at number 62 on the Billboard 200 and "I'm in the Mood" won the Grammy Award for Best Traditional Blues Performance. Produced by Roy Rogers of the Delta Rhythm Kings, and executive produced by Mike Kappus (who also conceived the idea for the project), the album had such success that it "permitted John Lee Hooker to live out the end of his life in comfort".