Deniece Williams - It's Gonna Take A Miracle (1982)

Deniece Williams - It's Gonna Take A Miracle (1982)
"It's Gonna Take a Miracle" is a popular song written by Teddy Randazzo, Bobby Weinstein, and Lou Stallman. It was first an R&B hit in 1965 for The Royalettes, who reached the Top 30 on the U.S. R&B chart and peaked at number 41 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and number 37 on Cash Box.

The most successful version of "It's Gonna Take a Miracle" was the 1982 remake by R&B and gospel artist Deniece Williams. Her version went to number one on the R&B chart for two weeks and reached number ten on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.



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The song was originally written and intended for Little Anthony & The Imperials, but they never recorded it due to a royalty dispute with the song's writers/label owners Teddy Randazzo and Don Costa at the group's record label, DCP (Don Costa Productions) Records.

The Spinners - I'll Be Around (1972)

The Spinners - I'll Be Around (1972)
"I'll Be Around" is a song recorded by the American R&B vocal group The Spinners (known as "Detroit Spinners" in the UK). The song was co-written by Thom Bell and Phil Hurtt and produced by Bell.

Recorded at Philly's Sigma Sound Studios, the house band MFSB provided the backing. The production of the song gives it a smooth, mid-tempo feel, with the signature guitar riff (in octaves) played by Norman Harris at the forefront and punctuation from female background singers, the MFSB horns & strings and conga-playing from Larry Washington. Bobby Smith handles lead vocals on the song.



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The song was included on the group's 1972 self-titled album on Atlantic Records, their first album release for the label. It was initially released as the B-side of the group's first single on Atlantic Records, with "How Could I Let You Get Away" being the A-side. Radio deejays, however, soon opted for "I'll Be Around" which led to Atlantic flipping the single over and the song became an unexpected hit, eventually spending five weeks at number one on the U.S. R&B chart (the group's first number-one on the R&B chart), and reaching number three on the U.S. Pop chart in the fall of 1972. It also reached sales of over one million copies, The Spinners' first record ever to do so. The success of "I'll Be Around" would be the first in a series of chart successes The Spinners and Bell would have together during the 1970s.

Smokey Robinson & The Miracles - The Tracks Of My Tears (1965)

Smokey Robinson & The Miracles - The Tracks Of My Tears (1965)
"The Tracks of My Tears" is a song written by Smokey Robinson, Pete Moore, and Marv Tarplin. It is a multiple award-winning 1965 hit R&B song originally recorded by their group, The Miracles, on Motown's Tamla label. In 1967, Johnny Rivers covered the song and his version was a number 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. Linda Ronstadt recorded a hit cover of her own in 1975 that reached number 25 on the Hot 100 chart. Numerous other artists have recorded the song over the years.



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Doris Troy - Just One Look (1963)

Doris Troy - Just One Look (1963)
"Just One Look" is a song co-written by American R & B singers Doris Troy and Gregory Carroll. The recording by Doris Troy was a hit in 1963. The Hollies, Anne Murray and Linda Ronstadt recorded hit versions of their own. There have also been many other versions of this song.

Doris Troy had an extensive musical pedigree, and during her career she would write for and work with luminaries such as Dee Clark, Jackie Wilson, Chuck Jackson, Solomon Burke, the Drifters, James Brown, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Tom Jones, Steven Stills and many others. Despite all of this, she would chart only once, with her very first single for Atlantic, “Just One Look,” a killer number that is a beach music favorite even today.



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The Rascals - Groovin' (1967)

The Rascals - Groovin' (1967)
"Groovin" is a single released in 1967 by the Young Rascals that became a number-one hit and one of the group's signature songs.

Written by group members Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati and with a lead vocal from Cavaliere, it is a slow, relaxed groove, based on Cavaliere's newfound interest in Afro-Cuban music. Instrumentation included a conga, a Cuban-influenced bass guitar line from ace session musician Chuck Rainey, and a harmonica part, performed first for the single version by New York session musician, Michael Weinstein, and later for the album version by Gene Cornish.



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The single became an instant hit in May 1967, spending four weeks atop the Billboard pop singles chart, but not four consecutive weeks. The sequence was interrupted by Aretha Franklin's "Respect", which spent a week at No. 1 in the middle of "Groovin'"'s run. The song was RIAA-certified a gold record on June 13, 1967.

"Groovin'" dropped so quickly from the charts that Casey Kasem remarked on it in his radio show American Top 40 five years later.

Bloodstone - Natural High (1973) From "Natural High" (Single)

Bloodstone - Natural High (1973)  From "Natural High" (Single)
"Natural High" is a song performed by Bloodstone, released as the first single and title track from their second album. The song was written by the band's bassist Charles McCormick, and it was the first song from the band to enter the Billboard Hot 100, peaking at #10 in 1973.

In 1992, R&B group After 7 covered the song in a medley alongside The Originals' "Baby, I'm for Real". Released as "Baby, I'm for Real/Natural High", the song peaked at #55 on the Billboard Hot 100.



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GQ - I Do Love You (1979) From the album "Disco Nights"

G.Q. - I Do Love You (1979) From the album "Disco Nights"
"I Do Love You" is a song written and performed by Billy Stewart. It reached #6 on the U.S. R&B chart and #26 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1965. The song was featured on his 1965 album, I Do Love You.

GQ released a version of the song as a single in July 1979 which reached #5 on the U.S. R&B chart and #20 on the Billboard Hot 100. The song was featured on their 1979 album, Disco Nights.

The single ranked #99 on the Billboard Year-End Hot 100 singles of 1979.



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