Showing posts with label '60s #1 Hits. Show all posts
Showing posts with label '60s #1 Hits. Show all posts

Smokey Robinson & The Miracles - The Tracks Of My Tears (1965)

Smokey Robinson & The Miracles - The Tracks Of My Tears (1965)
"The Tracks of My Tears" is a song written by Smokey Robinson, Pete Moore, and Marv Tarplin. It is a multiple award-winning 1965 hit R&B song originally recorded by their group, The Miracles, on Motown's Tamla label. In 1967, Johnny Rivers covered the song and his version was a number 10 hit on the Billboard Hot 100. Linda Ronstadt recorded a hit cover of her own in 1975 that reached number 25 on the Hot 100 chart. Numerous other artists have recorded the song over the years.



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Doris Troy - Just One Look (1963)

Doris Troy - Just One Look (1963)
"Just One Look" is a song co-written by American R & B singers Doris Troy and Gregory Carroll. The recording by Doris Troy was a hit in 1963. The Hollies, Anne Murray and Linda Ronstadt recorded hit versions of their own. There have also been many other versions of this song.

Doris Troy had an extensive musical pedigree, and during her career she would write for and work with luminaries such as Dee Clark, Jackie Wilson, Chuck Jackson, Solomon Burke, the Drifters, James Brown, George Harrison, Ringo Starr, Tom Jones, Steven Stills and many others. Despite all of this, she would chart only once, with her very first single for Atlantic, “Just One Look,” a killer number that is a beach music favorite even today.



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The Rascals - Groovin' (1967)

The Rascals - Groovin' (1967)
"Groovin" is a single released in 1967 by the Young Rascals that became a number-one hit and one of the group's signature songs.

Written by group members Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati and with a lead vocal from Cavaliere, it is a slow, relaxed groove, based on Cavaliere's newfound interest in Afro-Cuban music. Instrumentation included a conga, a Cuban-influenced bass guitar line from ace session musician Chuck Rainey, and a harmonica part, performed first for the single version by New York session musician, Michael Weinstein, and later for the album version by Gene Cornish.



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The single became an instant hit in May 1967, spending four weeks atop the Billboard pop singles chart, but not four consecutive weeks. The sequence was interrupted by Aretha Franklin's "Respect", which spent a week at No. 1 in the middle of "Groovin'"'s run. The song was RIAA-certified a gold record on June 13, 1967.

"Groovin'" dropped so quickly from the charts that Casey Kasem remarked on it in his radio show American Top 40 five years later.

Mary Wells - Two Lovers (1962) From " Two Lovers" album

Mary Wells - Two Lovers (1962) From " Two Lovers" album
"Two Lovers" is a single released in 1962 by Mary Wells on the Motown record label. The song was the third consecutive hit to be both written and produced by Smokey Robinson of The Miracles and recorded by Mary Wells, the two previous charters being "The One Who Really Loves You" and "You Beat Me to the Punch." The song's cleverly devised lyrics at first appear to be about a girl singing to one lover who is "sweet and kind" and a second who treats her bad and makes her sad; eventually, the girl reveals that the two lovers are actually the same person. The song became Wells's most successful release to date, reaching #1 on the Billboard R&B chart and #7 on the Billboard pop chart. Its success would be eclipsed two years later by the singer's most successful release ever, the signature tune "My Guy."



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Patti Drew - Tell Him (1967) From "Workin' On A Groovy Thing....The Best Of" album

Patti Drew - Tell Him (1967) From "Workin' On A Groovy Thing....The Best Of" album
Millions of listeners have no doubt heard “Workin’ on a Groovy Thing”; problem is they are probably more familiar with the 5th Dimension’s Top 40 version than the original by Patti Drew. Although Drew' recorded a number of fine tunes, she never quite hit it big, and the stress of what was in her words a “brutal” touring schedule led her to suddenly retire from the music industry in 1971. Yet despite her limited output, she gave beach music audiences two excellent recordings in “Tell Him” and “Workin’ on a Groovy Thing.”



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Patti Drew was born in Charleston, South Carolina, but her family moved to Evanston, Illinois, in 1956. There Patti and her sisters, Lorraine and Erma, sang in the choir at their local church. Patti’s mother was a housekeeper for Maury Lathowers, the regional promotional manager for Capitol Records, and one Sunday, she asked Lathowers to come to church to hear her daughters sing. Lathowers ending up booking a formal audition for the girls, and after playing the demo for Capitol exec Peter Wright, they signed the group to a contract. Calling themselves the Drew-vels, for their first release they recorded a song Erma’s husband, Carlton Black, had written. “Tell Him,” with Black singing bass, was a huge regional hit in the Chicago area in 1964, though it only made it to #90 on the national R&B charts. The group released a few more singles, but having had no national success, they decided to break up.

The Delfonics - La La Means I Love You (1968)

The Delfonics - La La Means I Love You (1968)
"La-La (Means I Love You)" is a R&B/soul song by American vocal group The Delfonics. Released on January 26, 1968 by Philly Groove Records, the song was written by Thom Bell and William Hart and produced by Bell and Stan Watson.

The song was a number 4 US Billboard pop, number two R&B in 1968 and number 19 UK pop single in 1971. The song is one of the Delfonics' most enduring recordings and perhaps their best loved, seeing a number of cover versions as well.



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The Supremes - Where Did Our Love Go (1964) From The No. 1's Album

The Supremes - Where Did Our Love Go (1964) From The No. 1's Album
"Where Did Our Love Go" is a 1964 song recorded by American music group the Supremes for the Motown label.

Written and produced by Motown's main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, "Where Did Our Love Go" was the first single by the Supremes to go to the number-one position on the Billboard Hot 100 pop singles chart in the United States, a position it held for two weeks, from August 16 to August 29, 1964. It was also the first of five Supremes songs in a row to reach number one (the others being "Baby Love", "Come See About Me", "Stop! In the Name of Love", and "Back in My Arms Again"). The song also reached number one on the Cash Box R&B singles chart.



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The Supremes' version is ranked #475 on Rolling Stone's 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and was selected for preservation in the National Recording Registry in 2016 due to its "cultural, historic, or artistic significance." Billboard named the song #4 on their list of 100 Greatest Girl Group Songs of All Time.

Otis Redding - Chained And Bound (1965) The Great Otis Redding Sings Soul Ballads


Otis Redding - Chained And Bound (1965) The Great Otis Redding Sings Soul Ballads
A brief return to his ballad statements, "Chained and Bound," despite its relative chart failure (it only made number 70 on the R&B charts), was one of Otis Redding's finest early works. A gospel-soaked ballad that tugs at the heartstrings, it's really a definitive soul ballad. The horn section is stupendous and drives the song's message of heartbreak home with a low-key fury.



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Written with help from Alan Walden, the ballad “Chained and Bound” featured the most accomplished lyric Otis had composed to date. The playful irony of the title belies a song of celebration, sung by a man who’s “so glad, so glad, so glad” to be bound to a woman whose love is “sweeter than a grape on the vine.” Patterned on the chords and thirty-two-bar structure of “Pain in My Heart,” “Chained and Bound” was also the first song Otis had written that had a proper bridge. “I feel like standing up and telling the world,” he proclaims in this eight-bar interlude, which echoes the evangelical spirit of Solomon Burke’s recent hit “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love.” The uptempo B-side of the single sounded a similar note of confident assertion. “These are the words that I have to say / Live by them and love me . .. each and every day,” Otis sings in “Your One and Only Man.” Over the next three months, the single would sell more than 140,000 copies and rise to #6—by far Otis’s best showing to date—on the Cashbox R&B chart.

Solomon Burke - Cry To Me (1962) From If You Need Me Album


Solomon Burke - Cry To Me (1962) From If You Need Me Album
"Cry to Me" is a song written by Bert Berns (listed as "Bert Russell") and first recorded by American soul singer Solomon Burke in 1961. Released in 1962, it was Burke's second single to appear in both Billboard magazine's Hot R&B Sides and Hot 100 singles charts. Several other artists recorded the song, including Betty Harris (1963), Dionne Warwick (1963), the Pretty Things (1965), the Rolling Stones (1965), Freddie Scott (1967), Tom Petty (1979) and Precious Wilson (1980).

Released in 1962, "Cry to Me", backed with "I Almost Lost My Mind" (Atlantic 2131), became Burke's second entry in the US charts, peaking at number five on the R&B charts and number 44 on the Hot 100. On March 20, 1962, Burke sang "Cry to Me" on American Bandstand.



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Several artists have recorded versions of the song. Betty Harris' rendition (also produced by Bert Berns) reached R&B number 10 and Hot 100 number 23 in September 1963. English band the Pretty Things recorded it in 1965 and their version reached number 28 on the UK Singles Chart. Also in 1965, a rendition by the Rolling Stones was included on their Out of Our Heads on both the UK and US editions of the album. Freddie Scott recorded the song in 1967; his single peaked at numbers 40 on the R&B and 70 on the Hot 100. Jamaican singer Precious Wilson released a version in 1980.

Mary Wells - You Beat Me To The Punch (1962)


Mary Wells - You Beat Me To The Punch (1962)
"You Beat Me to the Punch" is a soul single by Motown singer Mary Wells, released on the Motown label in 1962. It was co-written by Smokey Robinson of the Miracles, who was responsible for the majority of hits released by Wells while she was a Motown artist, and another Miracles member, Ronnie White.

Following the success of the previous single, "The One Who Really Loves You", Motown released this record shortly after it was produced and the song performed similar work as "The One Who Really Loves You" did, becoming a Billboard Top 10 Pop smash, peaking at number nine on the pop chart and becoming her first number-one hit on the Billboard R&B singles chart. It also won Wells a Grammy nomination for Best Rhythm and Blues Recording.



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The Four Tops - It's The Same Old Song (1965) From Essential Collection Album


The Four Tops - It's The Same Old Song (1965) From Essential Collection Album
"It's the Same Old Song" is a 1965 hit single recorded by the Four Tops for the Motown label. Written and produced by Motown's main production team Holland–Dozier–Holland, the song is today one of The Tops' signature songs, and was notably created - from initial concept to commercial release - in 24 hours. It reached number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #2 on the Billboard R&B Singles chart. It also reached number 34 in the UK.



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Doris Troy - Time (1963) From Sings Just One Look Album


Doris Troy - Time (1963) From Sings Just One Look Album
The songwriting team of Doris Payne and Gregory Carroll, authors of eight of the twelve tracks on the immortal Just One Look album - including the hit title track, conclude the disc with two minutes and forty-six seconds of this song, "Time". Artie Ripp's percussive production adds another dimension to the singer's multi-faceted album, one worthy of the cult attention it has garnered over the years. That attention comes not only because there are so few solo albums from this vital artist, but because the compositions and vocals are so overwhelmingly beautiful. Quasi reggae guitar and piano play off of the rolling drums creating an interesting platform for Doris Troy's superb voice. The dynamics of that voice slip over and under the tension created by the unorthodox rhythms. "Never in all my wildest dreams/did I think I'd find love so divine" she sings in the middle 8, that voice unveiling the secrets of the universe. Payne/Troy sang on dozens and dozens of important recordings, but why her own original music wasn't covered more, and why she didn't release thirty or forty of her own albums is more of a mystery when you listen to this brilliant track.



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Ben E. King - This Magic Moment (1960) From The Very Best Of Ben E. King


Ben E. King - This Magic Moment (1960) From The Very Best Of Ben E. King
This Magic Moment
Composers: Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman
Original Artist: the Drifters
Label: Atlantic Records; Recording: Atlantic #2050 (45)
Release Year: 1960; Chart: #16 Billboard Hot 100 and #4 R&B
Cover Artist: Jay and the Americans
Label: United Artists Records; Recording: United Artists #50475 (45)
Release Year: 1968; Chart: #6 Billboard Hot 100



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Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman wrote so many famous songs in a very short period of time - “A Teenager in Love,” “Hushabye," “Turn Me I-oose,” “Little Sister," “His Latest Flame,” “Save the Last Dance for Me,” and “This Magic Moment” arc just a few. The latter was recorded first by Ben E. King and the Drifters in 1960 with a flawless siring section providing most of the accompaniment. It was a big hit on both the Pop and R&B charts.

Almost every single Ben E. King hit has been covered, and "This Magic Moment” is no exception. Very late in 1968, Jay Black and the Americans released their version. It quickly became the group’s fourth Top 10 hit and sold a million copies. For the song, the magic happened again.

Doc Pomus and Mort Shuman were both inducted (separately) into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

The Supremes - Come See About Me (1964)


"Come See About Me" is a 1964 song recorded by The Supremes for the Motown label.

The song became third of five consecutively released Supremes songs to top the Billboard pop singles chart in the United States (the others are "Where Did Our Love Go," "Baby Love," "Stop! In the Name of Love," and "Back in My Arms Again"). It topped the chart twice, non-consecutively; toppled by and later replacing The Beatles' "I Feel Fine" in December 1964 and January 1965.



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The Righteous Brothers - You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin' (1964)


"You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" is a song written by Phil Spector, Barry Mann, and Cynthia Weil. It was first recorded by the Righteous Brothers in 1964, and was produced by Phil Spector. Their recording is considered by some music critics to be the ultimate expression and illustration of Spector's "Wall of Sound" recording technique. It has also been described by various music writers as "one of the best records ever made" and "the ultimate pop record".



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The original Righteous Brothers version was a critical and commercial success on its release, becoming a number-one hit single in both the United States and the United Kingdom in February 1965. It was the fifth best selling song of 1965 in the US. It also entered the Top 10 in the UK chart on an unprecedented three separate occasions.

"You've Lost That Lovin' Feelin'" has been covered successfully by numerous artists. A 1965 hit cover by Cilla Black reached number 2 in the UK Singles Chart. Dionne Warwick took her version to number 16 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1969. A 1971 duet version by singers Roberta Flack and Donny Hathaway peaked at number 30 on the Billboard R&B singles chart. Long John Baldry charted at number 2 in Australia with his 1979 remake and a 1980 version by Hall and Oates reached number 12 on the US Hot 100.

In December 1999, the performing-rights organization Broadcast Music, Inc. (BMI) ranked the song as the most-played song on American radio and television in the 20th century, having accumulated more than 8 million airplays by 1999, and nearly 15 million by 2011. Additionally, the song was chosen as one of the Songs of the Century by RIAA and ranked No. 34 on the list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time by Rolling Stone. In 2015, the single was inducted into the National Recording Registry by the Library of Congress for being "culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant".

1910 Fruitgum Company (Music Group Biography)


1910 Fruitgum Company (Music Group Biography)
The prototypical bubblegum group, the 1910 Fruitgum Company was the brainchild of Buddah Records house producers Jerry Kasenetz and Jeff Katz, also the masterminds behind such phenoms as the Ohio Express and the Music Explosion. The Kasenetz-Katz formula was a simple one: they enlisted anonymous studio musicians (in this case, vocalists Mark Gutkowski and Joey Levine -- also the singer in the Ohio Express -- along with guitarists Frank Jeckell, Pat Karwan, and Chuck Travis, horn player Larry Ripley, and drummers Rusty Oppenheimer and Floyd Marcus), and prolifically recorded lightweight, fluffy pop songs which found an eager audience in fans looking for an alternative to the edgier rock music of the late '60s. With the 1910 Fruitgum Company, the Kasenetz-Katz team scored their first major hit, the 1968 Top Five smash "Simon Says," launching the bubblegum craze; that same year they also scored with the singles "1, 2, 3 Red Light" and "Goody Goody Gumdrops," all three issued as title tracks from the group's first trio of LPs. 1969's "Indian Giver," the title cut from the Fruitgum Company's fourth album, was their last Top Five hit, and after one last LP, Hard Ride, the group disbanded; some of its members later resurfaced in the Kasenetz-Katz Singing Orchestral Circus.

British Invasion Radio Playlist Part III (20 Songs)

British Invasion Radio Playlist Part III (20 Songs)
British Invasion is your time capsule into the swinging '60s when artists from all of the UK brought raw rock 'n' roll, beat and pop music to the rest of the globe. Are you a mod or a rocker?
Paused...

    British Invasion Radio Playlist Part II (20 Songs)

    British Invasion is your time capsule into the swinging '60s when artists from all of the UK brought raw rock 'n' roll, beat and pop music to the rest of the globe. Are you a mod or a rocker?
    Paused...

      British Invasion Radio Playlist Part I (20 Songs)

      British Invasion is your time capsule into the swinging '60s when artists from all of the UK brought raw rock 'n' roll, beat and pop music to the rest of the globe. Are you a mod or a rocker?
      Paused...

        The Zombies - Time of the Season (1968)

        "Time of the Season" is a song by the British rock band The Zombies, featured on their 1968 album Odessey and Oracle. It was written by keyboard player Rod Argent and recorded at Abbey Road Studios in August 1967.

        The Zombies - Time of the Season (1968)
        Several other songs from Odessey and Oracle were released as singles prior to "Time of the Season". Columbia Records supported the album and its singles at the urging of new A&R representative Al Kooper. One of the singles issued on Columbia's Date label was the non-commercial-sounding "Butcher's Tale", which Columbia thought might catch on as an anti-war statement, at the time a popular trend. "Time of the Season" was only released at Kooper's urging, initially coupled with its original UK B-side, "I'll Call You Mine", without success. After previous singles flopped, Date re-released "Time of the Season" backed with another UK flop single, "Friends of Mine", and it made its breakthrough in early 1969, over a year after the band split up. It reached number 3 on the Billboard Hot 100 in March, topped the Cashbox chart, and reached number 1 in Canada. It did not chart in the band's native Britain, despite being rereleased twice, but it later found success there with Rod Argent saying that it became "a classic in the UK, but it's never been a hit." In mid-1969, it peaked at number 2 on the South African hit parade.



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