Showing posts with label '60s #1 Hits. Show all posts
Showing posts with label '60s #1 Hits. Show all posts

Oct 12, 2019

I'm Looking Through You (Remastered) by The Beatles (1965)

Listen to I'm Looking Through You (Remastered) by The Beatles (1965)
"I'm Looking Through You" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles from their 1965 album Rubber Soul. It was written by Paul McCartney and credited to Lennon–McCartney. McCartney wrote the song about English actress Jane Asher, his girlfriend for much of the 1960s, and her refusal to give up her stage career and focus on his needs.



Oct 4, 2019

Whole Lotta Love by Led Zeppelin (1969)

Whole Lotta Love by Led Zeppelin (1969)
"Whole Lotta Love" is a song by English hard rock band Led Zeppelin. It is the opening track on the band's second album, Led Zeppelin II, and was released in the United States, several countries in Europe, and Japan as a single; as with other Led Zeppelin songs, no single was released in the United Kingdom. The US release became their first hit single, being certified Gold on 13 April 1970, having sold one million copies.



Whipping Post by The Allman Brothers Band (1969)

Whipping Post by The Allman Brothers Band (1969)
"Whipping Post" is a song by The Allman Brothers Band. Written by Gregg Allman, the five-minute studio version first appeared on their 1969 debut album The Allman Brothers Band. The song was regularly played live and was the basis for much longer and more intense performances.



Oct 2, 2019

Journey To The Center Of The Mind by The Amboy Dukes (1968)

Journey To The Center Of The Mind by The Amboy Dukes (1968)
"Journey to the Center of the Mind" is a song released by the Amboy Dukes in 1968. It reached number 16 on the Billboard charts in 1968 and number 19 in Canada.



Sep 15, 2019

Los Mitos - Es muy fácil (1969)

Los Mitos - Es muy fácil (1969)
Listen to Es muy fácil by Los Mitos. Join WLCY Radio Hits and play your favorite music offline.



Los Mitos - Si te acuerdas de mí (1969)

Los Mitos - Si te acuerdas de mí (1969)
Play full-length songs from Si Te Acuerdas de Mí by Los Mitos on your phone, computer and home audio system with WLCY Radio Hits.



Sep 14, 2019

Los Brincos - Mejor (1966)

Los Brincos - Mejor (1966)
Play full-length songs from Mejor by Los Brincos on your phone, computer and home audio system with WLCY Radio Hits.



Te Quiero Asi by Los Bravos (1967)

Te Quiero Asi by Los Bravos (1967)
Play full-length songs from Te Quiero Así by Los Bravos on your phone, computer and home audio system with WLCY Radio Hits.


El Loco Soy Yo by Los Bravos (1967)

El Loco Soy Yo by Los Bravos (1967)
Play full-length songs from El Loco Soy Yo by Los Bravos on your phone, computer and home audio system with WLCY Radio Hits.



Sep 2, 2019

El pobre (yo soy asi) by Los Pasos (1967)

El pobre (yo soy asi) by Los Pasos (1967)
Listen to El pobre (yo soy asi) by Los Pasos. Join WLCY Radio Hits and play your favorite music offline.



Aug 31, 2019

He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother by The Hollies (1969)

He Ain't Heavy He's My Brother by The Hollies (1969)
"He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother" is a ballad written by Bobby Scott and Bob Russell. Originally recorded by Kelly Gordon in 1969, the song became a worldwide hit for The Hollies later that year and again for Neil Diamond in 1970. The Hollies' recording, which featured Elton John on piano, was released in the UK on 1 September 1969 and on 1 December 1969 in the US. It reached No. 3 in the UK and No. 7 in the US.






In 1884, James Wells, Moderator of the United Free Church of Scotland, in his book The Parables of Jesus tells the story of a little girl carrying a big baby boy. Seeing her struggling, someone asked if she wasn't tired. With surprise she replied: "No, he's not heavy; he's my brother."

In a 1918 publication by Ralph Waldo Trine titled The Higher Powers of Mind and Spirit, he relates the following anecdote: "Do you know that incident in connection with the little Scottish girl? She was trudging along, carrying as best she could a boy younger, but it seemed almost as big as she herself, when one remarked to her how heavy he must be for her to carry, when instantly came the reply: 'He's na heavy. He's mi brither.'"

The first editor of Kiwanis magazine, Roe Fulkerson, published a column in September 1924 carrying the title "He Ain't Heavy, He's My Brother", the first use of the phrase exactly as it is rendered in the song title.

In the 1940s, the words, adapted as "He ain't heavy, Father, he's my brother", were taken as a slogan for Boys Town children's home by founder Father Edward Flanagan.

Aug 20, 2019

Soul Deep by The Box Tops (1969)

Soul Deep by The Box Tops (1969)
"Soul Deep" is a song by The Box Tops. It was the third of three singles released from their 1969 Dimensions LP. Lead vocals were provided by Alex Chilton. The earliest version had been recorded by Robbie Lane and the Disciples in 1966, later included on compilation LPs, including Backtrax in 1993.

The Box Tops' song became an international Top 40 hit, charting modestly at #22 in the UK and #18 in the U.S. It reached the Top 10 in Australia (#7) and in Canada (#9). "Soul Deep" did best in South Africa, where it reached #2.



Bedlam by The Bel-Airs (1962)

Bedlam by The BelAirs (1962)
Listen to Bedlam by The Bel-Airs. Join WLCY Radio Hits and play your favorite music offline.

The Bel-Airs were an early and influential surf rock band from South Bay, Los Angeles, active in the early 1960s.


Laugh, Laugh by The Beau Brummels (1965)

Laugh, Laugh by The Beau Brummels (1965)
"Laugh, Laugh" is a song by American rock group The Beau Brummels, written by guitarist Ron Elliott and produced by Sylvester Stewart, later known as Sly Stone. Released in December 1964 as the band's debut single, the song reached number 15 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 chart the following February. "Laugh, Laugh" was the first hit single to come out of the emerging San Francisco music scene in response to the British Invasion.


You've Got to Hide Your Love Away by The Beatles (1965)

You've Got to Hide Your Love Away by The Beatles (1965)
"You've Got to Hide Your Love Away" is a song by English rock band the Beatles. It was written and sung by John Lennon (credited to Lennon–McCartney) and released on the album Help! in August 1965.


Aug 18, 2019

Time Won't Let Me by The Outsiders (1966)

Time Won't Let Me by The Outsiders (1966)
"Time Won't Let Me" is a garage rock song that was recorded by the Outsiders, from Cleveland, Ohio, in September 1965, and which became a major hit in the United States in 1966, reaching #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 on the week of April 16 of that year. It is ranked as the 42nd biggest American hit of 1966. In Canada, the song also reached #5 in the weekly charts.


Get on up and Get Away by The Esquires (1967)

Get on up and Get Away by The Esquires (1967)
"Get on Up" is a song written by Johnny Taylor, Gilbert Moorer, and Bill Sheppard and performed by The Esquires. It reached #3 on the US R&B chart and #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967. The song was featured on their 1967 album, Get on Up and Get Away.


Judy in Disguise by John Fred & His Playboy Band (1968)

Judy in Disguise by John Fred & His Playboy Band (1968)
"Judy in Disguise (With Glasses)" is a song that was a hit for the Louisiana-based John Fred & His Playboy Band in late 1967. The song was jointly written and composed by Fred and bandmate Andrew Bernard. In January 1968, the song reached #1 in the U.S. and became a gold record. It also hit #1 in Germany, and Switzerland, and #3 in Canada and the United Kingdom.




Aug 9, 2019

The Boll Weevil Song by Brook Benton (1961)

The Boll Weevil Song by Brook Benton (1961)
"Boll Weevil" is a traditional blues song, also known by similar titles such as "Boweavil" or "Boll Weevil Blues". Many songs about the boll weevil were recorded by blues musicians during the 1920s through the 1940s. However, a rendition by Lead Belly recorded in 1934 by folklorist Alan Lomax led to its becoming well-known. A 1961 adaptation by Brook Benton became a pop hit, reaching number two on the Billboard Hot 100.




Perhaps as early as 1908, blues pioneer Charley Patton wrote a song called "Mississippi Boweevil Blues" and recorded it in July 1929 (as "The Masked Marvel") for Paramount Records. Some of the lyrics are similar to "Boll Weevil," describing the first time and "the next time" the narrator saw the boll weevil and making reference to the weevil's family and home. "Mother of the Blues" Ma Rainey recorded a song called "Bo-Weavil Blues" in Chicago in December 1923, and Bessie Smith covered it in 1924, but the song had little in common with Lead Belly's "Boll Weevil" aside from the subject matter.

Jul 28, 2019

She Loves You (Live At The BBC) by The Beatles (1963)

She Loves You (Live At The BBC) by The Beatles (1963)
"She Loves You" is a song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and recorded by English rock group the Beatles for release as a single in 1963. The single set and surpassed several sales records in the United Kingdom charts, and set a record in the United States as one of the five Beatles songs that held the top five positions in the charts simultaneously, on 4 April 1964. It is their best-selling single and the best selling single of the 1960s in the United Kingdom.