Showing posts with label '60s #1 Hits. Show all posts
Showing posts with label '60s #1 Hits. Show all posts

Aug 18, 2019

Time Won't Let Me by The Outsiders (1966)

Time Won't Let Me by The Outsiders (1966)
"Time Won't Let Me" is a garage rock song that was recorded by the Outsiders, from Cleveland, Ohio, in September 1965, and which became a major hit in the United States in 1966, reaching #5 on the Billboard Hot 100 on the week of April 16 of that year. It is ranked as the 42nd biggest American hit of 1966. In Canada, the song also reached #5 in the weekly charts.


Get on up and Get Away by The Esquires (1967)

Get on up and Get Away by The Esquires (1967)
"Get on Up" is a song written by Johnny Taylor, Gilbert Moorer, and Bill Sheppard and performed by The Esquires. It reached #3 on the US R&B chart and #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967. The song was featured on their 1967 album, Get on Up and Get Away.


Judy in Disguise by John Fred & His Playboy Band (1968)

Judy in Disguise by John Fred & His Playboy Band (1968)
"Judy in Disguise (With Glasses)" is a song that was a hit for the Louisiana-based John Fred & His Playboy Band in late 1967. The song was jointly written and composed by Fred and bandmate Andrew Bernard. In January 1968, the song reached #1 in the U.S. and became a gold record. It also hit #1 in Germany, and Switzerland, and #3 in Canada and the United Kingdom.




Aug 9, 2019

The Boll Weevil Song by Brook Benton (1961)

The Boll Weevil Song by Brook Benton (1961)
"Boll Weevil" is a traditional blues song, also known by similar titles such as "Boweavil" or "Boll Weevil Blues". Many songs about the boll weevil were recorded by blues musicians during the 1920s through the 1940s. However, a rendition by Lead Belly recorded in 1934 by folklorist Alan Lomax led to its becoming well-known. A 1961 adaptation by Brook Benton became a pop hit, reaching number two on the Billboard Hot 100.




Perhaps as early as 1908, blues pioneer Charley Patton wrote a song called "Mississippi Boweevil Blues" and recorded it in July 1929 (as "The Masked Marvel") for Paramount Records. Some of the lyrics are similar to "Boll Weevil," describing the first time and "the next time" the narrator saw the boll weevil and making reference to the weevil's family and home. "Mother of the Blues" Ma Rainey recorded a song called "Bo-Weavil Blues" in Chicago in December 1923, and Bessie Smith covered it in 1924, but the song had little in common with Lead Belly's "Boll Weevil" aside from the subject matter.

Jul 28, 2019

She Loves You (Live At The BBC) by The Beatles (1963)

She Loves You (Live At The BBC) by The Beatles (1963)
"She Loves You" is a song written by John Lennon and Paul McCartney and recorded by English rock group the Beatles for release as a single in 1963. The single set and surpassed several sales records in the United Kingdom charts, and set a record in the United States as one of the five Beatles songs that held the top five positions in the charts simultaneously, on 4 April 1964. It is their best-selling single and the best selling single of the 1960s in the United Kingdom.



Jul 21, 2019

Termination by Iron Butterfly (1968)

Termination by Iron Butterfly (1968)
"Termination" is a song written by Erik Brann and Lee Dorman and performed by the American rock band Iron Butterfly from their 1968 album In-A-Gadda-Da-Vida.



Iron Butterfly will forever be remembered as the first heavy metal band.

Jul 16, 2019

Pinball Wizard by The Who (1969)

Pinball Wizard by The Who (1969)
"Pinball Wizard" is a song written by Pete Townshend and performed by the English rock band the Who, and featured on their 1969 rock opera album Tommy. The original recording was released as a single in 1969 and reached No. 4 in the UK charts and No. 19 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

The B-side of the "Pinball Wizard" single is an instrumental credited to Keith Moon, titled "Dogs (Part Two)". Despite the title, it has no musical connection to the Who's 1968 UK single "Dogs".


Jul 14, 2019

Pleasant Valley Sunday by The Monkees (1967)

Pleasant Valley Sunday by The Monkees (1967)
"Pleasant Valley Sunday" is a song by Gerry Goffin and Carole King, most famous for the version recorded by the Monkees in 1967. Goffin's and King's inspiration for the name was a street named Pleasant Valley Way, in West Orange, New Jersey where they were living at the time. The road follows a valley through several communities among the Watchung Mountains. The lyrics were a social commentary on status symbols, creature comforts, life in suburbia and "keeping up with the Joneses". It became one of the Monkees' most successful singles.


Jul 12, 2019

I Think We're Alone Now by Tommy James and the Shondells (1967)

I Think We're Alone Now by Tommy James and the Shondells (1967)
"I Think We're Alone Now" is a song written and composed by Ritchie Cordell that was the title selection from a same-named album released by the American recording artists Tommy James and the Shondells. "I Think We're Alone Now" was a 1967 US hit for James and the Shondells, reaching number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song has since been covered several times by other artists.

Sunshine Of Your Love by Cream (1967)

Sunshine Of Your Love by Cream (1967)
"Sunshine of Your Love" is a 1967 song by the British rock band Cream. With elements of hard rock, psychedelia, and pop, it is one of Cream's best known and most popular songs.

It entered Billboard magazine's Hot 100 chart on 13 January 1968, reaching number 36 during its initial 14-week run. The record re-entered the chart on 6 July 1968 and reached number five on 31 August 1968. In the UK, the single was not released until September 1968, after Cream had announced their impending breakup. Polydor Records issued the UK single, which reached number 25 in the charts.


Jul 10, 2019

The Rain, The Park & Other Things by The Cowsills (1967)

The Rain, The Park & Other Things by The Cowsills (1967)
"The Rain, the Park & Other Things" is a psychedelic pop song with music and lyrics co-written by Artie Kornfeld and Steve Duboff. It was recorded by the pop band The Cowsills, and included on their 1967 album The Cowsills. Released as a single, the song reached #2 on the Billboard charts. It was kept from the #1 spot by Daydream Believer by The Monkees. The single cemented the group's international popularity and sold some three million copies over the years. It ties with 1969's "Hair" as the group's biggest hit, as both reached #2 in the U.S. It reached #1 in Canada's RPM Magazine charts.

Jul 9, 2019

Green River by Creedence Clearwater Revival (1969)

Green River by Creedence Clearwater Revival (1969)
"Green River" is a song by American rock band Creedence Clearwater Revival. The song was written by John Fogerty and was released as a single in July 1969, one month before the album of the same name was released (see 1969 in music).

Jul 7, 2019

Love Hurts by The Everly Brothers (1960)

Love Hurts by The Everly Brothers (1960)
"Love Hurts" is a song written and composed by the American songwriter Boudleaux Bryant. First recorded by the Everly Brothers in July 1960, the song is also well known from a 1975 international hit version by the Scottish hard rock band Nazareth and in the UK by a top five hit in 1975 by the English singer Jim Capaldi.


If I Fell by The Beatles (1964)

If I Fell by The Beatles (1964)
"If I Fell" is a song by English rock band the Beatles which first appeared in 1964 on the album A Hard Day's Night in the United Kingdom and United States, and on the North American album Something New. It was credited to Lennon–McCartney, but John Lennon often stated that he wrote it.


Jul 5, 2019

A Whiter Shade of Pale by Procol Harum (1967)

A Whiter Shade of Pale by Procol Harum (1967)
"A Whiter Shade of Pale" is the debut single by the British rock band Procol Harum, released 12 May 1967. The single reached number 1 in the UK Singles Chart on 8 June 1967 and stayed there for six weeks. Without much promotion, it reached number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States. One of the anthems of the 1967 Summer of Love, it is one of the best selling singles in history, having sold more than 10 million copies worldwide.

Jul 1, 2019

Simon Says by 1910 Fruitgum Company (1967)

Simon Says by 1910 Fruitgum Company (1967)
"Simon Says" is a bubblegum pop song written by Elliot Chiprut and originally recorded, in 1967, by the 1910 Fruitgum Company, becoming their most successful chart hit.

The song was based on the children's game "Simon says." Produced by Jerry Kasenetz, Jeffry Katz, and Chiprut, the single was issued by Buddah Records and entered the U.S. Hot 100 in January 1968, rising to #4 on the chart. It was also a hit in the UK, where it reached #2 on the singles chart.


Jun 30, 2019

Sweet Pea by Tommy Roe (1966)

Sweet Pea by Tommy Roe (1966)
"Sweet Pea" is a song written and performed by Tommy Roe. It reached number 1 in Canada, number 1 in New Zealand, number 7 in Australia, and number 8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1966. It was featured on his 1966 album, Sweet Pea. The song was ranked number 44 on Billboard magazine's Top Hot 100 songs of 1966.


Jun 28, 2019

Bad Moon Rising by Creedence Clearwater Revival (1969)

Bad Moon Rising by Creedence Clearwater Revival (1969)
"Bad Moon Rising" is a song written by John Fogerty and performed by Creedence Clearwater Revival. It was the lead single from their album Green River and was released in April 1969, four months before the album. The song reached No. 2 on the Hot 100 on 28 June 1969 and No. 1 on the UK Singles Chart for three weeks in September 1969 (see 1969 in music). It was CCR's second gold single.


Jun 23, 2019

Kind Of A Drag by The Buckinghams (1967)

Kind Of A Drag by The Buckinghams (1967)
"Kind of a Drag" is a song written by Jim Holvay and recorded by the Buckinghams. It was the title track of their debut LP. The single reached number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in February 1967, becoming the first #1 single within the new calendar year and remaining in the top position for two weeks. It was the first of the band's three Top 10 hits in 1967, including five total Top 40 hits for that year.


Jun 9, 2019

Voodoo Child (Slight Return) by The Jimi Hendrix Experience (1968)

Voodoo Child (Slight Return) by The Jimi Hendrix Experience (1968)
"Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" is a song recorded by the Jimi Hendrix Experience in 1968 that appears as the final track on the Electric Ladyland album released that year. It contains improvised guitar and a vocal from Jimi Hendrix, backed by Noel Redding on bass and Mitch Mitchell on drums. The song is one of Hendrix's best known; it was a feature of his concert performances throughout his career, and several live renditions were recorded and released on later albums.