Silver Convention - Get Up and Boogie (That's Right) from the album Silver Convention (1976)

Silver Convention - Get Up and Boogie (That's Right) from the album Silver Convention (1976)



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"Get Up and Boogie" is a song by German disco act Silver Convention from their 1976 second album of the same name. The song was written and composed by Sylvester Levay and Stephan Prager, and produced by Prager. The song was released as the lead single from the album Get Up and Boogie (also titled Silver Convention in some countries) in 1976.

Just like their previous 1975 hit single "Fly, Robin, Fly", "Get Up and Boogie" consists of six words repeated throughout the song: "Get up and boogie! That's right!".

"Get Up and Boogie" hit number one on June 15, 1976 in Canada, and reached #2 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. Billboard ranked it as the #24 song for 1976. "Get Up and Boogie" also became a hit during the late-1970s disco scene.
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Tommy James - Draggin' the Line from the album Christian of the World (1971)

Tommy James - Draggin' the Line from the album Christian of the World (1971) WLCY Radio



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"Draggin' the Line" is a hit song by American rock musician Tommy James, who went solo after Tommy James and the Shondells broke up in 1970. It was first released as the B side of "Church Street Soul Revival" in 1970. The song was judged to have some hit potential so they went back in the studio and added horns to the master and re-released it as an A side single in 1971. It was included on his second album, Christian of the World in 1971 on the Roulette Records label, the song was James' biggest hit as a solo artist selling more than a million copies, and appears as the fifth track on James' 1991 retrospective album The Solo Years (1970-81) released by Rhino.

Written and produced by Tommy James and Bob King, "Draggin' the Line" reached the top 40 on the U.S.'s Billboard Hot 100 chart on June 26, 1971, climbed to a peak of #4 for the week of August 7, 1971, and remained in the top 40 rankings for 11 weeks total. The song reached even higher in Cash Box magazine's competing jukebox singles charts, attaining the #2 spot for the week of August 9, 1971. "Draggin' the Line" was ranked at #54 overall for hot songs of 1971 by U.S. music industry pillar Billboard magazine.

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Have You Ever Seen The Rain by Creedence Clearwater Revival
Long Cool Woman (In A Black Dress) by The Hollies
Mama Told Me (Not To Come) by Three Dog Night
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Tommy James
The Turtles
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Threshold / Jet Airliner - Steve Miller Band from the album Book of Dreams (1977)

Threshold / Jet Airliner - Steve Miller Band from the album Book of Dreams (1977)



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"Jet Airliner" is a song composed by Paul Pena and popularized by the Steve Miller Band.

Pena wrote and recorded the song in 1973 for his New Train album. However, due to conflicts between him and his label, New Train was not released until 2000. Miller decided to record "Jet Airliner" for his band's Book of Dreams album in 1977 after hearing the unreleased album via Ben Sidran, who produced it, and who was formerly in Miller's band. The Steve Miller band version has lyrics that are slightly different from the Pena original. It was concurrently released as a single, and reached #8 on the Billboard chart. In Canada, the song spent two weeks at #3.

On classic rock radio, "Jet Airliner" is generally played in tandem with "Threshold", the all-synthesizer instrumental that precedes it on Book of Dreams and Miller's Greatest Hits 1974–78 compilation.

The song's main guitar riff as played by Miller is reminiscent of (but not identical to) one used by Eric Clapton in Cream's version of Robert Johnson's song "Cross Road Blues" (from Cream's 1968 album Wheels of Fire). Miller's performance of the main riff is in turn slightly different from Pena's original, which has a more funky edge to it. The song is also notable for an early reference to the catchphrase "keep on keepin' on," also found in the Bob Dylan songs "Tangled Up in Blue" and "You Ain't Goin' Nowhere."
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Frankie Valli - Swearin' to God from the album Closeup (1975)

Frankie Valli - Swearin' to God from the album Closeup (1975) WLCY Radio



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"Swearin' to God" is a song written by Bob Crewe and Denny Randell. It was recorded by Frankie Valli and released in May 1975 as a single from his album Closeup. It's a love song whose lyrical hook is a more literal use of the expression "I swear to God" (i.e., "I mean this sincerely"):

I'm swearin' to God / So glad He's givin' me you

Valli's first disco-style song (it runs four minutes as a single but just over ten minutes on the album), "Swearin' to God" features Patti Austin singing a response to Valli's praise in the bridge. It is one of Valli's best known songs.[citation needed] "Swearin' to God" hit number 6 on the U.S. Billboard charts and also charted in the UK (#31).
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Neil Diamond - Song Sung Blue from the album Moods (1972)

Neil Diamond - Song Sung Blue from the album Moods (1972)



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"Song Sung Blue" is a 1972 hit song written and recorded by Neil Diamond, inspired by the second movement of Mozart's Piano Concerto #21. The song was released on Diamond's album, Moods and later appeared on many of Diamond's live and compilation albums.

It was his second No. 1 hit on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States, after 1970's "Cracklin' Rosie". The song spent twelve weeks in the Top 40. In addition, "Song Sung Blue" spent seven weeks at No. 1 on the adult contemporary chart. In addition, the song made the pop chart in the United Kingdom, reaching No. 14 on the UK Singles Chart. The song has become one of Diamond's standards, and he often performs this song during concerts.

"Song Sung Blue" was nominated for two Grammy Awards in 1973, Record of the Year and Song of the Year. Both awards that year were won by Roberta Flack's rendition of Ewan MacColl's song, "The First Time Ever I Saw Your Face".
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John Denver - Take Me Home, Country Roads from the album Poems, Prayers & Promises (1971)

John Denver - Take Me Home, Country Roads from the album Poems, Prayers & Promises (1971)



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"Take Me Home, Country Roads" is a song written by Bill Danoff, Taffy Nivert, and John Denver, and initially recorded by John Denver. It was included on his 1971 breakout album Poems, Prayers & Promises.

The song was a success on its initial release and was certified Gold by the RIAA on August 18, 1971. The song became one of John Denver's most popular and beloved songs, and is still very popular around the world. It has continued to sell, with over a million digital copies sold in the United States. It is considered to be Denver's signature song.

The song also has a prominent status as an iconic symbol of West Virginia, which it describes as "almost Heaven"; for example, it was played at the funeral memorial for U.S. Senator Robert Byrd in July 2010. In March 2014, it became the official state anthem of West Virginia.

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Take Me Home, Country Roads by The Tennessee Riders
Have You Ever Seen The Rain by Creedence Clearwater Revival
Wagon Wheel by Old Crow Medicine Show
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Eagles - One of These Nights from the album One of These Nights (1975)

Eagles - One of These Nights from the album One of These Nights (1975) WLCY Radio



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"One of These Nights" is a song written by Don Henley and Glenn Frey and recorded by the American rock band the Eagles. The title track from their One of These Nights album, the song became their second single to top the Billboard Hot 100 chart after "Best of My Love" and also helped propel the album to number one. The single version was shortened from the album version of the song, removing most of the song's intro and most of its fade-out, as well. Henley is lead vocalist on the verses, while Randy Meisner sings high harmony (not lead) on the refrain. The song features a guitar solo by Don Felder that is "composed of blues-based licks and sustained string bends using an unusually meaty distortion tone."

The song was a conscious attempt by the band to write something different from a country-rock and ballad-type song. Don Henley said: "We like to be a nice little country-rock band from Los Angeles ... about half the time". He added: "We wanted to get away from the ballad syndrome with "One of These Nights." With Don Felder in the band now, we can really rock." Frey said that they "wanted 'One of These Nights' to have a lot of teeth, a lot of bite—a nasty track with pretty vocals."
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Donna Summer - Hot Stuff from the album Bad Girls (1979)

Donna Summer - Hot Stuff from the album Bad Girls (1979)



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"Hot Stuff" is a song by American singer Donna Summer, released in 1979 as the first single release from her Bad Girls album through Casablanca Records. Up to that point, Summer had mainly been associated with disco songs but this song also showed a significant rock direction, including a guitar solo by ex-Doobie Brother and Steely Dan guitarist Jeff "Skunk" Baxter. It is one of her most popular songs, based on the performance on the Billboard Hot 100.

"Hot Stuff" won Summer the Grammy Award for Best Female Rock Vocal Performance in the inaugural year the award was given out. In 2010, the song was ranked #104 on Rolling Stone's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time".
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Eric Burdon & War - Spill the Wine from the album Eric Burdon Declares "War" (1970)




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"Spill the Wine" is a 1970 song performed by Eric Burdon and War. Released as a single in May 1970 (backed by the non-album track "Magic Mountain"), it was War's first chart hit, peaking at number three in the US. Billboard ranked the record as the No. 20 song of 1970. It was also a top three hit in Canada and Australia. It charted #15 in Netherlands and #28 in Germany.

An edited version, released as a promo single for radio stations and subsequently included on most compilations, omits the middle spoken recitation, plus one chorus. A sound of a French woman is heard in the background. A flute solo also dominates the song.
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Electric Light Orchestra - Shine a Little Love from the album Discovery (1979)

Electric Light Orchestra  - Shine a Little Love from the album Discovery (1979) WLCY Radio



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"Shine a Little Love" is a song by the Electric Light Orchestra (ELO). It was released as a single in the US and UK in May 1979.

The song is the first track on their 1979 album Discovery. This was one of the band's most commercially successful singles, peaking at no. 1 in Canada, no. 6 in the UK Singles Chart and no. 8 in the US Billboard Hot 100. The song subsequently became one of their biggest worldwide hits as well. The 12" release was also available in white vinyl. Two different promotional videos were filmed for the single, a recording studio version shot on 35mm film, minus the band's three string players and a video-taped version made for the Discovery video album, featuring the full touring line-up.

A bit of a disco beat on this one, and quite a lot of things going on, forty piece string section and all. It's very jolly and bouncy and I must have been in a very good mood when I wrote it! ”

— Discovery remaster (2001), Jeff Lynne
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Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show - When You're in Love with a Beautiful Woman (1979)

Dr. Hook & the Medicine Show - When You're in Love with a Beautiful Woman (1979) WLCY Radio



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"When You're in Love with a Beautiful Woman" is a popular single by Dr. Hook. It was recorded at Muscle Shoals Sound Studio, Alabama.

Written by Even Stevens, who followed producer Ron Haffkine into the studio bathroom to pitch him the song. When You're in Love with a Beautiful Woman first appeared on the band's 1978 album Pleasure and Pain. Riding the disco wave in 1979 it belatedly became an international hit, reaching number six on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the USA and doing even better in the UK where it spent three weeks at number one in the UK Singles Chart in November 1979.The song was subsequently added to the band's 1979 album Sometimes You Win. It features background vocals by three female singers.

The song also featured throughout the 2005 Rockstar game The Warriors.

The song was covered by country music artist Conway Twitty in 1990 on his album Crazy In Love.
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Mouth & MacNeal - How Do You Do? from the album Hey You Love / How Do You Do (1971)

Mouth & MacNeal - How Do You Do? from the album Hey You Love / How Do You Do (1971)



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"How Do You Do" released in 1971 was an international hit single for Dutch duo Mouth & MacNeal. It was #1 in the Netherlands, Belgium, Denmark, Switzerland and New Zealand. It also spent 19 weeks in the Billboard Hot 100 a year later, and a cover version by Scots-German duo Die Windows (later Windows) reached #1 in Germany. The single earned Mouth & MacNeal, and its composers Hans van Hemert and Harry van Hoof, the 1972 Buma Export Award for the most records sold abroad by a Dutch musical act in that year.
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Kenny Rogers - Lucille from the album Kenny Rogers (1977)

Kenny Rogers - Lucille from the album Kenny Rogers (1977)



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"Lucille" is a song written by Roger Bowling and Hal Bynum, and recorded by American country music artist Kenny Rogers. It was released in January 1977 as the second and final single from the album Kenny Rogers. The song is about a man in a bar who meets a woman who has left her husband. It became Rogers' first major hit as a solo artist after leaving the successful country/rock group The First Edition the previous year. An international hit, it reached number 1 on the Billboard Country Singles chart and number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100. Overseas, "Lucille" reached the top of the UK Singles Chart in June 1977, the first of Rogers' two number one singles there.
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The Raiders - Indian Reservation (The Lament of the Cherokee Reservation Indian) (1971)

The Raiders - Indian Reservation (The Lament of the Cherokee Reservation Indian) (1971)



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"Indian Reservation (The Lament of the Cherokee Reservation Indian)" is a song written by John D. Loudermilk. The song was first recorded by Marvin Rainwater in 1959 and released on MGM as "The Pale Faced Indian", but that release stayed unnoticed. The first hit version was a 1968 cover by Don Fardon, a former member of The Sorrows, that reached #20 on the Billboard Hot 100 and #3 on the UK Singles Chart.

In 1971 Paul Revere & the Raiders recorded the song on the Columbia Records label, and it topped the Hot 100 on July 24. The RIAA gold certification followed on 30 June 1971 for selling over a million copies. It was later certified platinum for selling an additional million copies. The song was the group's only #1 US Billboard hit, and their final Top Twenty song.

Historical context


The song refers to the forcible removal and relocation of the Five Civilized Tribes, including the Cherokee people, from the southeastern states of Georgia, North Carolina, Florida, Mississippi and Alabama to the southern Indian Territory in present-day Oklahoma. The removal of these tribes throughout the 1830s is often referred to as the "Trail of Tears". The removal of the Cherokee, Chickasaw, Choctaw, Creek and Seminole came on the heels of President Andrew Jackson's key legislation, the Indian Removal Act of 1830. The Cherokee were the last of the Five Civilized Tribes to be removed after signing the Treaty of New Echota.
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The Hollies - Long Cool Woman (In a Black Dress) from the album Distant Light (1972)

The Hollies - Long Cool Woman (In a Black Dress) from the album Distant Light (1972)


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"Long Cool Woman in a Black Dress" (also called "Long Cool Woman" or "Long Cool Woman (in a Black Dress)") is a song written by Allan Clarke, Roger Cook, and Roger Greenaway and performed by the British rock group The Hollies. Originally appearing on the album Distant Light, it was released as a single in April 1972 (on Parlophone in the United Kingdom), selling 1.5 million copies in the United States and two million worldwide. It reached No. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 in September 1972. Billboard ranked it as the No. 24 song for 1972.
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Hamilton, Joe Frank, & Reynolds - Don't Pull Your Love from the album Greatest Hits (1971)

Hamilton, Joe Frank, & Reynolds - Don't Pull Your Love from the album Greatest Hits (1971)



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"Don't Pull Your Love" is a classic song written by Brian Potter and Dennis Lambert. The song was originally released in 1971 by Hamilton, Joe Frank & Reynolds. The song was an international hit, hitting number one on the U.S. Cash Box Top 100 and reaching number four on the Billboard Hot 100, as well as Billboard's Country and Easy Listening charts. In Canada, the song spent one week at number one. "Don't Pull Your Love" became a gold record. Session musicians later referred to as the Wrecking Crew were hired to record the instruments instead of Hamilton, Frank and Reynolds.
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Blue Magic - Sideshow from the album Blue Magic (1974)

Blue Magic - Sideshow from the album Blue Magic (1974)



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"Sideshow" is a song recorded by American R&B soul vocal quintet Blue Magic, released in 1974. It was first released on the album Blue Magic and when issued as a single it sold over a million copies, going to #1 R&B and #8 pop in the United States in the summer of 1974. Billboard ranked it as the No. 19 song for 1974. It was covered as a reggae version by Barry Biggs who reached #3 on the UK Singles Chart in January 1977. It has also been covered by Ray, Goodman & Brown, Silk, and Joss Stone.

The song is noted for its introduction, featuring a repeat of the first 10 notes of a slow version of Julius Fucik's "Entrance of the Gladiators" while one of the band's members acts like a master of ceremonies, declaring: "Hurry!! Hurry!!! Step right up! See the saddest show in town for only 50 cents!"

The follow-up song was the similarly themed "Three Ring Circus" (which was similarly covered as a later single by Biggs). Some radio edits fade the song out several seconds earlier before the repeat of the Introduction in the Coda section, which also features a repeat of the chorus, due to the length of the song.
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The Guess Who - No Sugar Tonight from the album American Woman (1970)

The Guess Who - No Sugar Tonight from the album American Woman (1970)



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"No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature" is a song by the Canadian rock band The Guess Who. It was released on their 1970 album American Woman, and was released on the B-side of the "American Woman" single without the "New Mother Nature" section. The single was officially released as "No Sugar Tonight/New Mother Nature" and peaked at #1 on the RPM magazine charts (three weeks) and #5 on the Billboard Hot 100. In Cash Box, which at the time ranked sides independently, "No Sugar Tonight" reached #39.
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George Harrison - Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth) from the album Living in the Material World (1973)

George Harrison - Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth) from the album Living in the Material World (1973)



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"Give Me Love (Give Me Peace on Earth)" is a song by English musician George Harrison, released as the opening track of his 1973 album Living in the Material World. It was also issued as the album's lead single, in May that year, and became Harrison's second US number 1, after "My Sweet Lord". In doing so, the song demoted Paul McCartney and Wings' "My Love" from the top of the Billboard Hot 100, marking the only occasion that two former Beatles have held the top two chart positions in America. The single also reached the top ten in Britain, Canada, Australia and other countries around the world.
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Randy VanWarmer - Just When I Needed You Most from the album Warmer (1979)

Randy VanWarmer - Just When I Needed You Most from the album Warmer (1979)



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"Just When I Needed You Most" is the title of a 1979 hit single by the American singer-songwriter Randy VanWarmer.

Released as a single in February 1979, VanWarmer's "Just When I Needed You Most" spent two weeks atop the US Billboard adult contemporary chart in May of that year  and in June 1979 reached its peak position of No. 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart accruing an overall Top 40 tenure of 14 weeks and earning RIAA Gold record status. In addition, the track reached No. 71 on the Billboard country music chart. and in September 1979 made the Top 10 on the UK Singles Chart, peaking at No. 8. VanWarmer attributed his single's success to empathy for its heartbreak scenario: "It's happened to everyone. That emotion is universal...I always hoped the record wasn't wallowing in self-pity and it had some redeeming value, and I guess it does." VanWarmer also attributed his single's success to the autoharp instrumental break between the second and third verses, performed by John Sebastian.
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