Showing posts with label Walter Murphy. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Walter Murphy. Show all posts

Sep 14, 2019

Russian Dressing (Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1) by Walter Murphy (1976)

Russian Dressing (Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1) by Walter Murphy (1976)
Play full-length songs from Russian Dressing (Tchaikovsky's Piano Concerto No. 1) by Walter Murphy on your phone, computer and home audio system with WLCY Radio Hits.



Jul 27, 2019

Flight 76 (Flight of the Bumble Bee) by Walter Murphy (1976)

Flight 76 (Flight of the Bumble Bee) by Walter Murphy (1976)
Play full-length songs from Flight 76 (Flight of the Bumble Bee) by Walter Murphy on your phone, computer and home audio system with WLCY Radio Hits.


Oct 15, 2015

Walter Murphy - A Fifth of Beethoven (Beethoven's Fifth Symphony) (1976)

Walter Murphy - A Fifth of Beethoven (Beethoven's Fifth Symphony) (1976)
"A Fifth of Beethoven" is a disco instrumental recorded by Walter Murphy and the Big Apple Band. It was adapted by Murphy from the first movement of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony. The record was produced by noted production music and sound effects recording producer Thomas J. Valentino. It was one of the most popular and memorable pieces of music from the disco era. The "Fifth" in the song's title is a pun, referencing a liquid measure approximately equal to one-fifth of a gallon, a popular size for bottles containing hard liquor, as well as Beethoven's Fifth Symphony from which the song was adapted.




The song when released entered the Billboard Hot 100 at number 80 on May 29, 1976, and took 19 weeks to reach number 1, where it stayed for one week becoming Murphy's best known work and his only Top 40 hit. Early in 1977, it was licensed to RSO Records for inclusion on the soundtrack to the movie Saturday Night Fever.

Even though Murphy played nearly every instrument on the instrumental, his record company cautioned that the record would stand a better chance if credited to a group rather than an individual. To Murphy's annoyance, they came up with the name Walter Murphy and the Big Apple Band, only to discover two days after its release that there was already a Big Apple Band. The name on the label was changed to The Walter Murphy Band and then simply to Walter Murphy.