Showing posts with label 1967. Show all posts
Showing posts with label 1967. Show all posts

Aug 18, 2019

Get on up and Get Away by The Esquires (1967)

Get on up and Get Away by The Esquires (1967)
"Get on Up" is a song written by Johnny Taylor, Gilbert Moorer, and Bill Sheppard and performed by The Esquires. It reached #3 on the US R&B chart and #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1967. The song was featured on their 1967 album, Get on Up and Get Away.


Jul 14, 2019

Pleasant Valley Sunday by The Monkees (1967)

Pleasant Valley Sunday by The Monkees (1967)
"Pleasant Valley Sunday" is a song by Gerry Goffin and Carole King, most famous for the version recorded by the Monkees in 1967. Goffin's and King's inspiration for the name was a street named Pleasant Valley Way, in West Orange, New Jersey where they were living at the time. The road follows a valley through several communities among the Watchung Mountains. The lyrics were a social commentary on status symbols, creature comforts, life in suburbia and "keeping up with the Joneses". It became one of the Monkees' most successful singles.


Jul 12, 2019

I Think We're Alone Now by Tommy James and the Shondells (1967)

I Think We're Alone Now by Tommy James and the Shondells (1967)
"I Think We're Alone Now" is a song written and composed by Ritchie Cordell that was the title selection from a same-named album released by the American recording artists Tommy James and the Shondells. "I Think We're Alone Now" was a 1967 US hit for James and the Shondells, reaching number 4 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The song has since been covered several times by other artists.

Sunshine Of Your Love by Cream (1967)

Sunshine Of Your Love by Cream (1967)
"Sunshine of Your Love" is a 1967 song by the British rock band Cream. With elements of hard rock, psychedelia, and pop, it is one of Cream's best known and most popular songs.

It entered Billboard magazine's Hot 100 chart on 13 January 1968, reaching number 36 during its initial 14-week run. The record re-entered the chart on 6 July 1968 and reached number five on 31 August 1968. In the UK, the single was not released until September 1968, after Cream had announced their impending breakup. Polydor Records issued the UK single, which reached number 25 in the charts.


Jul 10, 2019

The Rain, The Park & Other Things by The Cowsills (1967)

The Rain, The Park & Other Things by The Cowsills (1967)
"The Rain, the Park & Other Things" is a psychedelic pop song with music and lyrics co-written by Artie Kornfeld and Steve Duboff. It was recorded by the pop band The Cowsills, and included on their 1967 album The Cowsills. Released as a single, the song reached #2 on the Billboard charts. It was kept from the #1 spot by Daydream Believer by The Monkees. The single cemented the group's international popularity and sold some three million copies over the years. It ties with 1969's "Hair" as the group's biggest hit, as both reached #2 in the U.S. It reached #1 in Canada's RPM Magazine charts.

Jul 5, 2019

A Whiter Shade of Pale by Procol Harum (1967)

A Whiter Shade of Pale by Procol Harum (1967)
"A Whiter Shade of Pale" is the debut single by the British rock band Procol Harum, released 12 May 1967. The single reached number 1 in the UK Singles Chart on 8 June 1967 and stayed there for six weeks. Without much promotion, it reached number 5 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in the United States. One of the anthems of the 1967 Summer of Love, it is one of the best selling singles in history, having sold more than 10 million copies worldwide.

Jul 1, 2019

Simon Says by 1910 Fruitgum Company (1967)

Simon Says by 1910 Fruitgum Company (1967)
"Simon Says" is a bubblegum pop song written by Elliot Chiprut and originally recorded, in 1967, by the 1910 Fruitgum Company, becoming their most successful chart hit.

The song was based on the children's game "Simon says." Produced by Jerry Kasenetz, Jeffry Katz, and Chiprut, the single was issued by Buddah Records and entered the U.S. Hot 100 in January 1968, rising to #4 on the chart. It was also a hit in the UK, where it reached #2 on the singles chart.


Jun 23, 2019

Kind Of A Drag by The Buckinghams (1967)

Kind Of A Drag by The Buckinghams (1967)
"Kind of a Drag" is a song written by Jim Holvay and recorded by the Buckinghams. It was the title track of their debut LP. The single reached number one on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in February 1967, becoming the first #1 single within the new calendar year and remaining in the top position for two weeks. It was the first of the band's three Top 10 hits in 1967, including five total Top 40 hits for that year.


Jun 11, 2019

Los Pasos - Ayer tuve un sueño (1967)

Los Pasos - Ayer tuve un sueño (1967)
Ayer tuve un sueño es una canción de música pop grabada por banda española Los Pasos, en 1967.

May 31, 2019

San Francisco by Scott McKenzie (1967)

San Francisco by Scott McKenzie (1967)
"San Francisco (Be Sure to Wear Flowers in Your Hair)" is an American pop music song, written by John Phillips of The Mamas & the Papas, and sung by Scott McKenzie. The song was produced and released in May 1967 by Phillips and Lou Adler, who used it to promote their Monterey International Pop Music Festival held in June of that year.

Released on May 13, 1967, the song was an instant hit. By the week ending July 1, 1967, it reached the number four spot on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US, where it remained for four consecutive weeks.


The Letter by The Box Tops (1967)

The Letter by The Box Tops (1967)
"The Letter" is a song written by Wayne Carson that was first recorded by the American rock band The Box Tops in 1967. It was sung in a gruff blue-eyed soul style by Alex Chilton. The song was the group's first and biggest record chart hit, reaching number one in the United States and Canada. It was also an international success and reached the top ten in several other countries.

Rolling Stone magazine included the Box Tops original at number 372 on its list of the "500 Greatest Songs of All Time"; the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame added it to the list of the "500 Songs That Shaped Rock and Roll". In 2011, the single was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame.


May 11, 2019

Somebody to Love (Original) by Jefferson Airplane (1967)

Somebody to Love (Original) by Jefferson Airplane (1967)
"Somebody to Love" (originally titled "Someone to Love") is a rock song that was written by Darby Slick. It was originally recorded by The Great Society, and later by Jefferson Airplane. Rolling Stone magazine ranked Jefferson Airplane's version No. 274 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.


Jan 21, 2019

The Amboy Dukes & Ted Nugent - Baby Please Don't Go (1967)

The Amboy Dukes & Ted Nugent WLCY Radio Hits
"Baby, Please Don't Go" is a blues song that has been called "one of the most played, arranged, and rearranged pieces in blues history" by French music historian Gérard Herzhaft. Delta blues musician Big Joe Williams popularized the song with several versions beginning in 1935.

In the 1960s, "Baby, Please Don't Go" became a popular rock song after the Northern Irish group Them recorded it in 1964. Several music writers have identified Jimmy Page, a studio guitarist at the time, as participating in the recording, although his exact contributions are unclear. Subsequently, Them's uptempo rock arrangement also made it a rock standard. AC/DC, Aerosmith, and The Amboy Dukes are among the rock groups who have recorded the song. "Baby, Please Don't Go" has been inducted into both the Blues and Rock and Roll Halls of Fame.


Jan 9, 2019

Brenton Wood - Gimme Little Sign (1967)

Brenton Wood - Gimme Little Sign (1967)
"Gimme Little Sign" is a classic soul music song, originally performed by Brenton Wood. It was released in 1967 on the album Oogum Boogum. It was written by Wood (under his real name, Alfred Smith), Joe Hooven and Jerry Winn. The most well-known version is by Brenton Wood, which peaked at number 9 in the US Billboard Hot 100 chart, and also was top 10 in the UK Singles Chart and Australia. Mighty Mo Rodgers played the electronic organ on the recording.



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It has also been a hit for Danielle Brisebois in 1995, and also covered by the Sattalites, Hepcat, Mina, Don Dixon, Syl Johnson in 1979 on his album Uptown Shakedown and Peter Andre. Andre's version was his second single, released in 1992, which went on to win him an ARIA Award in 1993 for highest-selling Australian single of the year. It was also covered by Roberto Jordán and Cox in one Spanish version, and by Los Straitjackets in another. Jay Dee aka J-Dilla remixed the song, which was released as a 45 rpm promo.

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Dec 23, 2018

The Beatles - All You Need Is Love (1967)

"All You Need Is Love" is a song by the English rock band the Beatles that was released as a non-album single in July 1967. It was written by John Lennon and credited to Lennon–McCartney. The song served as Britain's contribution to Our World, the first live global television link, when the Beatles were filmed performing it at EMI Studios in London on 25 June 1967. The programme was broadcast via satellite and seen by an audience of over 400 million in 25 countries. Lennon's lyrics, which were deliberately simplistic to allow for the show's international audience, captured the utopian sentiments of the Summer of Love era. The single topped sales charts in Britain, the United States and many other countries, and became an anthem for the counterculture's embrace of flower power ideology.



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Jan 22, 2018

The Rascals - Groovin' (1967)

The Rascals - Groovin' (1967)
"Groovin" is a single released in 1967 by the Young Rascals that became a number-one hit and one of the group's signature songs.

Written by group members Felix Cavaliere and Eddie Brigati and with a lead vocal from Cavaliere, it is a slow, relaxed groove, based on Cavaliere's newfound interest in Afro-Cuban music. Instrumentation included a conga, a Cuban-influenced bass guitar line from ace session musician Chuck Rainey, and a harmonica part, performed first for the single version by New York session musician, Michael Weinstein, and later for the album version by Gene Cornish.



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The single became an instant hit in May 1967, spending four weeks atop the Billboard pop singles chart, but not four consecutive weeks. The sequence was interrupted by Aretha Franklin's "Respect", which spent a week at No. 1 in the middle of "Groovin'"'s run. The song was RIAA-certified a gold record on June 13, 1967.

"Groovin'" dropped so quickly from the charts that Casey Kasem remarked on it in his radio show American Top 40 five years later.

Jan 15, 2018

Patti Drew - Tell Him (1967) From "Workin' On A Groovy Thing....The Best Of" album

Patti Drew - Tell Him (1967) From "Workin' On A Groovy Thing....The Best Of" album
Millions of listeners have no doubt heard “Workin’ on a Groovy Thing”; problem is they are probably more familiar with the 5th Dimension’s Top 40 version than the original by Patti Drew. Although Drew' recorded a number of fine tunes, she never quite hit it big, and the stress of what was in her words a “brutal” touring schedule led her to suddenly retire from the music industry in 1971. Yet despite her limited output, she gave beach music audiences two excellent recordings in “Tell Him” and “Workin’ on a Groovy Thing.”



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Patti Drew was born in Charleston, South Carolina, but her family moved to Evanston, Illinois, in 1956. There Patti and her sisters, Lorraine and Erma, sang in the choir at their local church. Patti’s mother was a housekeeper for Maury Lathowers, the regional promotional manager for Capitol Records, and one Sunday, she asked Lathowers to come to church to hear her daughters sing. Lathowers ending up booking a formal audition for the girls, and after playing the demo for Capitol exec Peter Wright, they signed the group to a contract. Calling themselves the Drew-vels, for their first release they recorded a song Erma’s husband, Carlton Black, had written. “Tell Him,” with Black singing bass, was a huge regional hit in the Chicago area in 1964, though it only made it to #90 on the national R&B charts. The group released a few more singles, but having had no national success, they decided to break up.

Nov 2, 2017

Herman's Hermits - There's A Kind Of Hush (1967)


"There's a Kind of Hush" is a popular song written by Les Reed and Geoff Stephens which was a hit in 1967 for Herman's Hermits and again in 1976 for The Carpenters.

Herman's Hermits - There's A Kind Of Hush (1967)
The song was introduced on the 1966 album Winchester Cathedral by Geoff Stephens' group the New Vaudeville Band; like that group's hit "Winchester Cathedral", "There's a Kind of Hush" was conceived as a neo-British music hall number although it is a less overt proponent of that style. The first single version of "There's a Kind of Hush" was recorded in 1966 by Gary and the Hornets, a teen/pre-teen male band from Franklin, Ohio whose version—entitled "A Kind of Hush" produced by Lou Reizner—became a regional success and showed signs of breaking nationally in January 1967; the single would reach No. 4 in Cincinnati and No. 3 in Erie PA. However an expedient cover by Herman's Hermits was released in the US in February 1967 to reach the Top 30 of the Billboard Hot 100 in three weeks and proceed to a peak of #4—affording the group their final US Top Ten hit—with Gold certification for US sales of one million units awarded that April. In the UK Herman's Hermits' "There's a Kind of Hush" would reach No. 7. The success of the Herman's Hermits version led to the release of the original New Vaudeville Band track as a single in some territories with both of these versions charting in Australia with peaks of No. 5 (Herman's Hermits) and No. 12 (New Vaudeville Band) and also in South Africa where the New Vaudeville Band bested the Herman's Hermits' No. 9 peak by reaching No. 4.

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Jackie Wilson - (Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher And Higher (1967)

Jackie Wilson - (Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher And Higher (1967)



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"(Your Love Keeps Lifting Me) Higher and Higher" is an R&B song, originally performed and made a Top 10 Pop, #1 R&B hit by Jackie Wilson in 1967.

As the song was originally used as a backing track for Wilson to use later, it was recorded on July 6, 1967, at Columbia's studios in Chicago. Produced by Carl Davis, the session, arranged by Sonny Sanders, featured bassist James Jamerson, drummer Richard "Pistol" Allen, guitarist Robert White, and keyboardist Johnny Griffith; these four musicians were all members of the Motown Records house band The Funk Brothers who often moonlighted on sessions for Davis to augment the wages paid by Motown.

Released in August 1967, the song reached No. 1 in the US Billboard R&B chart and, in November, peaked on the Billboard Hot 100 at No. 6. In the UK Singles Chart, Wilson's version was a hit in 1969 (No. 11), 1975 (No. 25), and 1987 (No. 15).

Brunswick Records then released an album titled Higher and Higher in November 1967. Its chart peak was No. 163 (Billboard 200) and No. 28 (Billboard R&B Albums chart.)

The track was ranked No. 246 on Rolling Stone's list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, and was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 1999.

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May 21, 2017

The Grass Roots - Let's Live For Today on The Best Of The Grass Roots (1967)

The Grass Roots - Let's Live For Today - WLCY Radio Hits
"Let's Live for Today" is a song written by David Shapiro, Ivan Mogul, and Michael Julien, and initially recorded by the English band The Rokes in 1966. The song was later popularized by the American rock band The Grass Roots, who released it as a single on May 13, 1967. The Grass Roots' version climbed to #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, eventually selling over two million copies and being awarded a gold disc. The song was also included, as the title track, on The Grass Roots' second album, Let's Live for Today. Since its initial release, The Grass Roots' rendition of the song has become a staple of Oldies radio programming in America and is today widely regarded as a 1960s classic.



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