Showing posts with label '70s Slow Dance. Show all posts
Showing posts with label '70s Slow Dance. Show all posts

Melissa Manchester - Midnight Blue - On Melissa Album (1975)

Melissa Manchester - Midnight Blue - On Melissa Album (1975)
Melissa Manchester '70s Slow Dance on WLCY Radio





"Midnight Blue" is a song by Melissa Manchester. Taken from the album Melissa, it was written by Manchester with lyricist Carole Bayer Sager in 1973. It reached #6 on the Billboard Hot 100 in the summer of 1975 and topped the Billboard Easy Listening chart for two weeks.

The song is heard on the radio in the 1978 film Ice Castles. An excerpt from "Midnight Blue" ("Wouldn't you give your hand to a friend?") is included among 12 others in the 1975 novelty hit song by Dickie Goodman entitled "Mr. Jaws".

The song has also been recorded by Shirley Bassey, Cristy Lane, Johnny Mathis, Arthur Prysock, Vanessa Williams and Viola Wills. An Italian rendering: "E L'Amore Che Muore", was recorded by Wess & Dori Ghezzi for their 1977 album Insieme.
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Barry Manilow - I Write The Songs - On Ultimate Manilow Album (1975)

Barry Manilow - I Write The Songs - On Ultimate Manilow Album (1975)
Barry Manilow '70s Slow Dance on WLCY Radio





"I Write the Songs" is a popular song written by Bruce Johnston in 1975 and made famous by Barry Manilow. Manilow's version reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in January 1976 after spending two weeks atop the Billboard adult contemporary chart in December 1975. It won a Grammy Award for Song of the Year and was nominated for Record of the Year in 1977. Billboard ranked it as the No. 13 song of 1976.

The original version was recorded by The Captain & Tennille, who worked with Johnston in the early 1970s with The Beach Boys. It appears on their 1975 album, Love Will Keep Us Together. The first release of I Write the Songs as a single was by then teen-idol David Cassidy from his 1975 solo album The Higher They Climb, which was also produced by Bruce Johnston. Cassidy's version reached #11 on the UK Singles Chart in August of that year.

Johnston has stated that, for him, the "I" in the song is God and that songs come from the spirit of creativity in all of us. He has said that the song is not about his Beach Boys bandmate Brian Wilson.

Manilow was initially reluctant to record the song, stating in his autobiography Sweet Life: "The problem with the song was that if you didn't listen carefully to the lyric, you would think that the singer was singing about himself. It could be misinterpreted as a monumental ego trip." After persuasion by Clive Davis, then president of Arista Records, Manilow recorded the song, and his version of "I Write the Songs" was the first single taken from the album Tryin' to Get the Feeling. It first charted on the Billboard Hot 100 on November 15, 1975, reaching the top of the chart nine weeks later, on January 17, 1976.
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Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes - If You Don't Know Me By Now (1972)

Harold Melvin & The Blue Notes - If You Don't Know Me By Now (1972)
'70s Slow Dance on WLCY Radio




"If You Don't Know Me by Now" is a song written by Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff and recorded by the Philly soul musical group Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, which became their first hit after being released as a single in 1972 topping the US R&B chart and peaking at number three on the US Pop chart.

The song was originally written for Labelle (a trio led by Patti LaBelle) but they never recorded it. Much like the issue with "I Miss You" and The Dells passing on it, the song's composers Kenny Gamble and Leon Huff gave the song to Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, which featured Teddy Pendergrass as lead vocalist. In addition to the single release, the song was included on their debut album I Miss You.

Patti LaBelle later made the song as part of her concert repertoire in 1982. A live version appears on her 1985 album, Patti.

It was later covered by the English pop/soul band Simply Red, also becoming their best-known hit after reaching number one on the U.S. Hot 100 on July 15, 1989 and at number thirty-eight on the Hot Black Singles chart. It peaked at number two in the UK Singles Chart. It also topped the Canadian Singles Chart. Seal recorded the song for his 2008 album Soul, and, in April 2009, it became his first top-ten Adult Contemporary hit since "Love's Divine" in 2004; the song was subsequently nominated for the Best Male Pop Vocal Performance Grammy.

Rod Stewart also included this song on his 2009 album Soulbook.

The song was chosen as one of the Songs of the Century by the RIAA. It was featured at the end of Michael Apted's movie Class Action.
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Chicago - Colour My World (1970)

Chicago - Colour My World (1970)
'70s Slow Dance on WLCY Radio




"Colour My World" is a song written by American musician James Pankow, one of the founding members of the rock/jazz fusion band Chicago. Part of Pankow's "Ballet for a Girl in Buchannon" song cycle/suite, it was recorded for their second album Chicago, also called Chicago II (1970). Terry Kath is heard in the lead vocal, and Walter Parazaider performs the highly recognizable flute solo.

The song was initially released as the B-side to "Make Me Smile" in March 1970. It was re-released in June 1971 as the B-side to the re-release of "Beginnings"; this second single reached #7 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100.

"Colour My World" became a popular "slow-dance" song at high school proms and university dances during the 1970s.
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Dan Fogelberg - Longer (1979)

Dan Fogelberg - Longer
'70s Slow Dance on WLCY Radio






Longer is a song written and recorded by the American singer-songwriter Dan Fogelberg. The song can be found on Fogelberg's 1979 album Phoenix. It was also included on his 1982 greatest hits album as well as various other retrospective and compilation recordings.

Fogelberg, who had released more rock-oriented songs throughout the 1970s, jokingly described "Longer" in the liner notes to one of his retrospective albums as "the song that put me on the elevators." He wrote the song while vacationing in Maui, "lounging in a hammock one night and looking up at the stars. It just seems this song was drifting around the universe, saw me, and decided I'd give it a good home." Accompanying Fogelberg's vocals is an acoustic guitar (played by the singer) as well as a flugelhorn solo by Jerry Hey.

Lyrically, the song compares various events ("Longer than there've been stars up in the heavens") with his emotional attachment to the one he loves ("I've been in love with you").
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