Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - An American Dream On An American Dream Album (1979)

Nitty Gritty Dirt Band - An American Dream On An American Dream Album (1979)
Nitty Gritty Dirt Band '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"An American Dream" is a song written by Rodney Crowell. He recorded it under the title "Voilá, An American Dream" on his 1978 album Ain't Living Long Like This, and released it as the B-side to that album's single "(Now and Then There's) A Fool Such as I".

It was later recorded by American country music group Nitty Gritty Dirt Band. It was released in November 1979 as the only single and title track from the album An American Dream. The song reached number 58 on the Billboard Hot Country Singles & Tracks chart but peaked at number 13 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. The Nitty Gritty Dirt Band's version features a backing vocal from Linda Ronstadt.
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Tavares - Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel - On Anthology Album (1976)

Tavares - Heaven Must Be Missing An Angel - On Anthology Album (1976)
Tavares '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"Heaven Must Be Missing an Angel" is a disco song written by Freddie Perren and Keni St. Lewis. It was recorded by the American band Tavares in 1976. It was released as a single from the album Sky High! and was split into two parts: the first part was 3 minutes and 28 seconds in length, while the second part was 3 minutes and 10 seconds.

"Heaven Must Be Missing an Angel" reached #15 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1976. It peaked at #3 on the Hot Soul Singles chart. "Heaven Must Be Missing an Angel" spent two weeks at #1 on the Hot Dance Club Play chart. It became the group's only Gold record.

The song would also afford the group an international chart hit, reaching #1 in the Netherlands, and charting in Australia (#30), Canada (#11), the UK (#4), and South Africa (#16).
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Al Stewart - Year Of The Cat - On Year Of The Cat Album (1976)

Al Stewart - Year Of The Cat - On Year Of The Cat Album (1976)
Al Stewart '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"Year of the Cat" is a single by singer-songwriter Al Stewart, released in July 1976. The song is the title track of his 1976 album Year of the Cat, and was recorded at Abbey Road Studios, London in January 1976 by engineer Alan Parsons. The song reached #8 on the Billboard Hot 100 in March 1977. Although Stewart's highest charting single on that chart was 1978's "Time Passages", "Year of the Cat" has remained Stewart's signature recording, receiving regular airplay on both classic rock and folk rock stations.

The track is noted for its lengthy instrumental sections— over four minutes of the 6:40 album version is instrumental, including a long, melodic series of solos that encompasses cello, violin, piano, acoustic guitar, distorted electric guitar, synthesizer and saxophone. The transition from acoustic guitar to electric to saxophone was initiated by Tim Renwick. The acoustic lead is played by Peter White with Tim Renwick then taking the electric lead. Parsons had Phil Kenzie add the saxophone part of the song — and by doing so transformed the original folk concept into the jazz-influenced ballad that put Al Stewart onto the charts.

Shorter versions of the track can be found on some European 7" single formats. Though both of the discs carry the same label and catalogue number (RCA PB 5007), the French single features the A-side track clocking in at 4:30, while the Italian one features an even shorter mix of just 3:30 so that the lengthy instrumental intro is completely missing.
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Patti Smith Group - Because The Night - On Easter Album (1978)

Patti Smith Group - Because The Night - On Easter Album (1978)
Patti Smith Group '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio





"Because the Night" is a song written by Bruce Springsteen and Patti Smith that was first released in 1978 as a single off the Patti Smith Group album Easter. It rose to #13 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart, as well as #5 in the United Kingdom, and helped propel sales of Easter to mainstream success—even as Smith was deciding to retire from a life of constant touring. In 1987, the song was ranked #116 on NME magazine's list of "The Top 150 Singles of All Time". It remains one of the best known songs of Smith's catalog.

The song was originally recorded by Bruce Springsteen during sessions for his Darkness on the Edge of Town album. He was not satisfied with it and later declared he already knew he wasn't going to finish it since it was "a[nother] love song"; the Patti Smith Group was working on Easter in the studio next door, with engineer/producer Jimmy Iovine working on both albums. Iovine gave Smith a tape of the song, she recast it, only retaining the chorus "Because the night belongs to lovers", and it was included on Easter, becoming the first single released from that album. Though it was never released on any of Springsteen's studio albums, in concert beginning with his Darkness Tour Springsteen would often perform the song with his own lyrics. The song was first performed live at a Patti Smith concert at CBGB's in New York City on December 30, 1977, with Springsteen joining on vocals and guitar. The only two commercially released recordings of a Springsteen version of the song were in the 1986 box set Live/1975–85, where Smith was listed as co-writer; and the 2010 compilation album The Promise (using the original recording from the Darkness on the Edge of Town sessions, but using Smith's lyrics).
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The Guess Who - These Eyes - On Greatest Hits Album (1969)

The Guess Who - These Eyes - On Greatest Hits Album (1969) -  WLCY Radio HITS
The Guess Who '60s #1 Hits On WLCY Radio




"These Eyes" is a song by the Canadian rock band The Guess Who. The song was co-written by the group's lead guitarist Randy Bachman and lead singer Burton Cummings and originally included on the band's 1969 album Wheatfield Soul. It was first released as a single (backed by "Lightfoot"), in their native Canada, where its chart success (#7) helped land them a U.S. distribution deal with RCA Records. It was then released in the U.S. in April 1969, and became a breakthrough success for the group, as it would be their first single to reach the top ten on the Billboard Pop Singles chart, peaking at number six, and would eventually be certified gold by the RIAA for sales of over one million copies. While it was actually the 18th single released by the band, it was the first from the quartet of Cummings, Bachman, Jim Kale, and Garry Peterson as produced by Jack Richardson.
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Stampeders - Sweet City Woman - On Sweet City Woman Album (1971)

Stampeders - Sweet City Woman - On Sweet City Woman Album (1971) On WLCY Radio
Stampeders '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"Sweet City Woman" is a 1971 song by Canadian rock band The Stampeders. The song appeared on their debut album Against the Grain (retitled Sweet City Woman in the U.S.). The song features a banjo as a primary instrument, which is also mentioned in the lyrics: "The banjo and me, we got a feel for singing."

The single spent four weeks as a #1 hit in Canada, and reached #8 in the U.S. charts. It also climbed to #1 on the Canadian country music and Adult contemporary charts. The song was also marketed in Canada by Quality Records with instrumental and French lyric versions.
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John Travolta & Olivia Newton-John - You're The One That I Want - On Grease OST Album (1978)

John Travolta & Olivia Newton-John - You're The One That I Want - On Grease OST Album (1978)
Jonh Travolta '70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"You're the One That I Want" is a song written by John Farrar for the 1978 film version of the musical Grease. It was performed by John Travolta and Olivia Newton-John. It is one of the best-selling singles of all time, having sold over 6 million copies among the United States, the United Kingdom, Germany and France alone.

Upon its release in conjunction with the film (and its status as a potential blockbuster worldwide), the single became a huge international hit, reaching number 1 in several countries. In the U.S. the single reached #1 on the Billboard Hot 100 for one week in June 1978, and was certified Platinum for shipments exceeding 2 million copies. It also topped the UK Singles Chart for nine weeks in the summer of 1978 some months before the film had even been released in that country.

As of 2013, it is still the fifth best-selling single of all time in the U.K., where it has sold 2 million copies.
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Meco - Star Wars Theme/Cantina Band - On The Best Of Meco Album (1977)

Meco - Star Wars Theme/Cantina Band - On The Best Of Meco Album (1977)
Meco '70s Lite Rock on WLCY Radio




"Star Wars Theme/Cantina Band" is a disco single recorded by Meco, taken from the album Star Wars and Other Galactic Funk. It hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on October 1, 1977, holding on to the spot for two weeks and peaked at no. 7 on the UK Singles Chart, remaining in the charts for nine weeks. To date it is the biggest-selling instrumental single in the history of recorded music, having sold two million units, being the only one ever to be certified Platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America.

In the late 1970s CBS Sports used the song as opening music for its NFL coverage.
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Neil Sedaka - Bad Blood - On The Definitive Collection Album (1975)

Neil Sedaka - Bad Blood - On The Definitive Collection Album (1975)
'70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"Bad Blood" is a popular song written by Neil Sedaka and Phil Cody. The song, with uncredited backing vocals by Elton John, reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in 1975, remaining in the top position for three weeks. It was certified gold by the RIAA and was the most successful individual commercial release in Sedaka's career. "Bad Blood" was replaced at the #1 spot by John's single, "Island Girl".
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Ann Peebles - I Can't Stand The Rain - On I Can't Stand The Rain Album (1973)

Ann Peebles - I Can't Stand The Rain - On I Can't Stand The Rain Album (1973)
'70s One-Hit Wonders on WLCY Radio




"I Can't Stand the Rain" is a song originally recorded by Ann Peebles in 1973, and written by Peebles, Don Bryant, and Bernard "Bernie" Miller. Other hit versions were later recorded by Eruption and Tina Turner.

In 1978 Eruption released a disco-oriented remake, which peaked at number six on the disco chart and became the group's biggest hit (number 18 on the Billboard Hot 100).
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The Beatles - Come Together - On Abbey Road Album (1969)

The Beatles - Come Together - On Abbey Road Album (1969)
'60s #1 Hits On WLCY Radio Hits




"Come Together" is a song by the Beatles written by John Lennon but credited to Lennon–McCartney. The song is the opening track on the album Abbey Road and was released as a double A-sided single with "Something", their 21st single in the United Kingdom and 26th in the United States. The song reached the top of the charts in the US and peaked at number four in the UK.
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Ted Nugent - Stranglehold - On Ted Nugent Album (1975)

Ted Nugent - Stranglehold - On Ted Nugent Album (1975)
Trans Am Rock on WLCY Radio




"Stranglehold" is a single and the first track from Ted Nugent's self-titled 1975 album. The vocals are performed not by Nugent, but by Derek St. Holmes. The "Sometimes you wanna get higher" verse is sung by Ted himself. In Martin Popoff's book, "Epic Ted Nugent", Nugent admits that the song "Stranglehold" was co-written by Rob Grange, yet he never received a share for co-writer. "Stranglehold" would set the stage for Nugent's career, a guitar-driven track over eight minutes long - its famous guitar solo having been recorded in a single take.

Stranglehold has been ranked 31st greatest guitar solo of all time by Guitar World.
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Santa Esmeralda - Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood (1977)

Santa Esmeralda - Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood (1977)
A Night at Studio 54 on WLCY Radio




"Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" is a song written by Bennie Benjamin, Gloria Caldwell, and Sol Marcus for the jazz singer and pianist Nina Simone, who first recorded it in 1964. "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" has been covered by many artists, including a 1965 blues rock hit by The Animals. A 1977 four-on-the-floor disco rearrangement by disco group Santa Esmeralda was also a hit. In September 2015, a cover of the song appeared on Lana Del Rey's fourth studio album Honeymoon.

A disco version of the song by the disco group Santa Esmeralda, which took The Animals' arrangement and added some disco, flamenco, salsa, and other Latin rhythm and ornamentation elements to it, also became a hit in the late 1970s. First released in summer 1977 as a 16-minute epic, that took up an entire side of their Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood album, it was picked up for more worldwide distribution by the label of the time, Casablanca Records. A 12-inch club remix was extremely popular, hitting number one on the U.S. Billboard Club Play Singles chart and in some European countries as well. The single peaked at number four on the Hot Dance/Disco-Club Play chart.[9] Released as a pop single late in the year, it did well as well, reaching number 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 by early 1978. NBC Sports would use the song frequently in the years following its release, especially during their coverage of the World Series.

Santa Esmeralda's "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" was used as the opening theme of the 1980 pilot for the U.S. game show Bullseye, after which a sound-alike was used in regular episodes. This version of the song was also used on German ARD soccer television show Sportschau from the late 1970s to the mid-1980s, in the introduction for the "goal of the month" segment. Santa Esmeralda's rendition is featured in the 1992 film American Me and the 2001 English comedy Blow Dry. It became widely popular with a later generation after its inclusion in the 2003 Quentin Tarantino film Kill Bill: Volume 1, where its instrumental passage plays over the duel between The Bride and O-Ren Ishii, and the accompanying Kill Bill Vol. 1 Original Soundtrack, where it is incorporated in a full vocal form that runs over ten minutes. A rendition appears in the trailer for the 2005 film Kiss Kiss Bang Bang, as well as the 2008 Korean "ramyun western" film The Good, the Bad, the Weird, played in the chasing sequence in the Manchurian desert.
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Crystal Gayle - Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue - On Crystal Gayle: The Hits Album (1977)

Crystal Gayle - Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue - On Crystal Gayle: The Hits Album (1977)
Crystal Gayle The Soft Pop '70s on WLCY Radio




"Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue" is a song written by Richard Leigh, and recorded by American country music singer Crystal Gayle. It was released in March 1977 as the first single from Gayle's album We Must Believe in Magic. Despite the title, Gayle herself has blue eyes.

The song became a worldwide hit single. In the United States, it topped the Billboard country music chart and was Gayle's first, (and biggest), crossover pop hit, reaching number 1 on the Cashbox Top 100 for two weeks, and number 2 on the Billboard Hot 100 for 3 weeks, behind Debby Boone's smash hit, "You Light Up My Life". The album received Platinum status, the first by a female country singer. The song became Gayle's signature piece throughout her career. In 1978, the song won Gayle a Grammy Award for Best Female Country Vocal Performance. In 1999, the song was recognized by ASCAP as one of the ten most-performed songs of the 20th century. The song has a jazzy feel to it when compared to many other country songs of that era. Gayle had many more hit singles for the next ten years, such as "Talking in Your Sleep", "Half the Way" "You and I" (a duet with Eddie Rabbitt) and "I'll Get Over You", but none have achieved the same level of success as "Don't It Make My Brown Eyes Blue".
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Chicago - Old Days - On Chicago VIII Album (1975)

Chicago - Old Days - On Chicago VIII Album (1975)
Chicago '70s Pop Morning on WLCY Radio




"Old Days" is a song written by James Pankow for the group Chicago and recorded for their album Chicago VIII (1975), with lead vocals by Peter Cetera. The second single released from that album, it reached #5 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and #3 on the Easy Listening chart.
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Eagles - Heartache Tonight - On The Long Run Album (1979)

Eagles - Heartache Tonight - On The Long Run Album (1979)
Eagles '70s Pop Morning on WLCY Radio




"Heartache Tonight" is a song written by Don Henley, Glenn Frey, Bob Seger and J. D. Souther, and recorded by the Eagles. The track was included on their album The Long Run and released as a single in 1979. It reached #1 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 in November of that year. Although it remained in the top position for only one week, the single sold 1 million copies. It was the Eagles' final chart-topping song on the Hot 100.

The recording also received a Grammy Award for Best Rock Performance by a Duo or Group with Vocal. The song originated from an electric jam session between Glenn Frey and J. D. Souther who would visit Frey's home in Los Angeles whenever he was in town on tour. Frey and Souther wrote the first verse while listening to Sam Cooke songs. In the heat of jamming, Frey called Seger on the phone and sang him the verse. Seger then blurted out the chorus. According to Frey, "J.D. Souther, Don and I finished that song up. No heavy lyrics-the song is more of a romp-and that's what it was intended to be." The song was covered by country music singer John Anderson on the tribute album Common Thread: The Songs of the Eagles and was also covered by Michael Bublé on his album Crazy Love.
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Blues Image - Ride Captain Ride - On Open Album (1970)

Blues Image - Ride Captain Ride - On Open Album (1970)
Blues Image '70s Pop Morning on WLCY Radio





"Ride Captain Ride" is a song recorded by the American rock band Blues Image. The song was co-written by the band's singer-guitarist Mike Pinera and keyboardist Frank "Skip" Konte. It was included on the group's 1970 album, Open. Released as a slightly shortened single in the spring of 1970, it shot up the charts, eventually reaching No. 4 in the USA and Canadian charts, making it Blues Image's first (and only) Top 40 chart hit. The guitar fills and main solo were performed by Kent Henry. Mike Pinera plays the guitar solo at the end of the song.

The song was inspired by the number of keys on Pinera's Rhodes piano. Pinera said, "Okay, I need a first word. And what came into my head was '73.' I liked the rhythm, and I went, '73 men sailed up, from the San Francisco Bay.' ... The song sort of just wrote itself from there."

The song was eventually remixed as a "psychedelic space version".
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