Fleetwood Mac - You Make Loving Fun (1977)

Fleetwood Mac - You Make Loving Fun (1977) on Rumours




"You Make Loving Fun" is a song written and sung by Christine McVie of the British-American band Fleetwood Mac. It was released as the fourth and final 45 rpm single from the band's album Rumours in 1977; its fourth top-ten hit, the song peaked at number nine on the Billboard Pop Singles Chart.

The song was inspired by an affair McVie had with Curry Grant. "To avoid flare-ups", she told her then-husband John McVie that the song was about her dog; he found out later what it was really about.

Early tracking of the song was done, according to McVie, in the absence of Lindsey Buckingham, which allowed her the freedom to "build the song on my own". The recording sessions were saturated with cocaine use. Buckingham played rhythm guitar (through a Leslie) and tracking was done with a Fender Rhodes, Nicks playing tambourine. John McVie's bass was rerecorded again later, and Mick Fleetwood and Christine McVie dubbed Hohner Clavinet parts. In an interview with the New York Post she remarked that she wanted it to be the third US single from the album, but instead "Don't Stop" was chosen, which boosted the album's commercial success in the US and the UK.

"You Make Loving Fun" was a concert staple for Fleetwood Mac and was played during every tour involving Christine McVie from 1976 until 1997, a year before McVie's departure from the band and retirement from touring. It has since been revived for Fleetwood Mac's 2014-2015 tour when McVie rejoined the band.
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Special of the day: The Beatles - While My Guitar Gently Weeps (1968)

Special of the day: The Beatles - While My Guitar Gently Weeps (1968)




"While My Guitar Gently Weeps" is a song written by George Harrison, first recorded by the Beatles in 1968 for their eponymous double album (also known as "the White Album"). The song features lead guitar by Eric Clapton, although he was not formally credited on the album.

"While My Guitar Gently Weeps" is ranked at number 136 on Rolling Stone‍ '​s "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time", number 7 on the magazine's list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Songs of All Time, and number 10 on its list of The Beatles 100 Greatest Songs. In an online poll held by Guitar World magazine in February 2012, "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" was voted the best of Harrison's Beatle-era songs. In October 2008, Guitar World ranked Clapton's playing at number 42 in its list of the "100 Greatest Guitar Solos".
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Atlanta Rhythm Section - Imaginary Lover (1978)

Atlanta Rhythm Section - Imaginary Lover (1978)




On February 26th 1978, "Imaginary Lover" by the Atlanta Rhythm Section entered Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart at position #70; and on May 28th it peaked at #7 (for 1 week) and spent 17 weeks on the Top 100. It spent 4 weeks on the Top 10; started out at #10, then to #9, next was #8, and finally to #7. Between 1974 and 1981 the sextet had fourteen records on the Top 100; with two making the Top 10, and its other Top 10 record, "So In To You", also reached #7 on the Top 100.

Put the Atlanta Rhythm Section before an audience and watch the boys from Doraville whip them to a screaming, foot-stomping frenzy with their all-time clasics. "So Into You," "Imaginary Lover," and "Champagne Jam," are just part of the specially priced two record set of ARS at their best, doing their best. (November 3, 1978. Billboard )

Features of This Track

basic rock song structures
a subtle use of vocal harmony
mild rhythmic syncopation
repetitive melodic phrasing
extensive vamping
a clear focus on recording studio production
minor key tonality
a vocal-centric aesthetic
mixed acoustic and electric instrumentation
electric guitar riffs
an electric guitar solo
a dynamic male vocalist
heavy instrumental improvisation
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Deep Purple - Highway Star (1972)

Deep Purple - Highway Star (1972)




"Highway Star" is a song by the English rock band Deep Purple. It is the opening track on their 1972 album Machine Head and is the fastest song in tempo on the album. It is characterised by a long, classically inspired guitar solo and organ solo. Organist Jon Lord claimed that the organ and guitar solos were based on Bach-like chord sequences.

This song was born on a tour bus going to Portsmouth in 1971 when a reporter asked the band how they wrote songs. To demonstrate, guitarist Ritchie Blackmore grabbed an acoustic guitar and began playing a riff consisting of a single "G" repeated over and over, while vocalist Ian Gillan improvised lyrics over the top. The song was refined and was performed that same night. The song first appears on the 1972 LP Machine Head. The track remains one of the band's staples in live concerts, and was the set opener even before it was released on any album.

The very first live version released, recorded live for German TV program Beat-Club in September 1971 is featured on the History, Hits & Highlights '68–'76 DVD. The most famous live version is featured on the 1972 live album Made in Japan, where "Highway Star" is the first song. It's also the opening track on the live albums Nobody's Perfect (1988) and Come Hell or High Water (1994).
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Queen - Bohemian Rhapsody (1975)

Queen - Bohemian Rhapsody (1975)




"Bohemian Rhapsody" is a song by the British rock band Queen. It was written by Freddie Mercury for the band's 1975 studio album A Night at the Opera. The song consists of several sections: a ballad segment ending with a guitar solo, an operatic passage, and a hard rock section. At the time, it was the most expensive single ever made.

When it was released as a single, "Bohemian Rhapsody" became a commercial success, staying at the top of the UK Singles Chart for nine weeks and selling more than a million copies by the end of January 1976. It reached number one again in 1991 for five weeks following Mercury's death, eventually becoming the UK's third best-selling single of all time. It topped the charts in several other markets as well, including Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Ireland and The Netherlands, later becoming one of the best-selling singles of all time. In the United States the song originally peaked at number nine in 1976. It returned to the chart at number two in 1992 following its appearance in the film Wayne's World, which revived its American popularity.

Although critical reaction was initially mixed, "Bohemian Rhapsody" remains one of Queen's most popular songs and is frequently placed on modern lists of the greatest songs of all time. The single was accompanied by a promotional video, which many scholars consider ground-breaking. In 2004, "Bohemian Rhapsody" was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. In 2012, the song topped the list on an ITV nationwide poll in the UK to find "The Nation's Favourite 70's Number One" over 60 years of music.
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Led Zeppelin - Stairway To Heaven (1971)

Led Zeppelin - Stairway To Heaven (1971)




"Stairway to Heaven" is a song by the English rock band Led Zeppelin, released in late 1971. It was composed by guitarist Jimmy Page and vocalist Robert Plant for the band's untitled fourth studio album (often referred to as Led Zeppelin IV). It is often referred to as one of the greatest rock songs of all time.

The song has three sections, each one progressively increasing in tempo and volume. The song begins with a slow acoustic-based folk melody accompanied by recorders before introducing electric instrumentation. The final section is an uptempo hard rock arrangement highlighted by Page's intricate guitar solo accompanying Plant's vocals that end with the plaintive a cappella line: "And she's buying a stairway to heaven".

"Stairway to Heaven" was voted #3 in 2000 by VH1 on its list of the 100 Greatest Rock Songs, and was placed at number 31 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of "The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time". It was the most requested song on FM radio stations in the United States in the 1970s, despite never having been officially released as a single there. In November 2007, through download sales promoting Led Zeppelin's Mothership release, "Stairway to Heaven" hit No. 37 on the UK Singles Chart.
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Rush - Tom Sawyer (1981)

Rush - Tom Sawyer (1981)




Tom Sawyer is a song by Canadian rock band Rush, named after Mark Twain's literary character. The song was released on Mercury Records and PolyGram in 1981 on the Moving Pictures album and numerous compilations thereafter, such as 1990's Chronicles. It has also appeared on several live albums and bootlegs. The song relies heavily on Geddy Lee's synthesizer playing and the techniques of drummer Neil Peart. Geddy Lee has referred to the track as the band's "defining piece of music...from the early '80s". It is one of Rush's best-known songs and is a staple of classic rock radio. It reached #25 in the UK Singles chart in October 1981 and in the US peaked at #44 on the Billboard Hot 100 and at #8 on the Billboard Top Tracks chart. In 2009 it was named the 19th-greatest hard rock song of all time by VH1. "Tom Sawyer" was one of five Rush songs inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame on March 28, 2010.
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Pink Floyd - Time (1973)

Pink Floyd - Time (1973)





"Time" is the fourth track from the English progressive rock band Pink Floyd's 1973 album The Dark Side of the Moon, and the only song on the album credited to all four members of the band, though the lyrics were written by Roger Waters. It is the final Pink Floyd song credited to all four members and the last to feature Richard Wright on lead vocals until "Wearing the Inside Out" on The Division Bell. This song is about how time can slip by, but many people do not realize it until it is too late. Roger Waters got the idea when he realized he was no longer preparing for anything in life, but was right in the middle of it. He has described this realisation taking place at ages 28 and 29 in various interviews. It is noted for its long introductory passage of clocks chiming and alarms ringing, recorded as a quadrophonic test by Alan Parsons, not specifically for the album.
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Taylor Swift - Bad Blood (2015)

Taylor Swift - Bad Blood (2015) On WLCY Radio




"Bad Blood" is a song by American singer-songwriter Taylor Swift, from her fifth studio album 1989 (2014). The single version, featuring American rapper Kendrick Lamar, was released on May 17, 2015 by Republic Records. The song reached number-one on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and is the third song from the album to do so.

"Bad Blood" first charted on the US Billboard Hot 100 for two weeks in November 2014 and January 2015 as an album cut from 1989, peaking at number 78. Following the music video premiere at the 2015 Billboard Music Awards, the remixed version of the song featuring Kendrick Lamar re-entered the chart at number 53 and number 26 on the Digital Songs Chart, selling 47,000 digital copies. The following week, the song topped the Billboard Hot 100 on the week ending May 24, 2015, selling 385,000 copies and jumping 52 positions, one of the largest jumps to the top spot in Billboard history. It became her fourth number one single and the third number one from 1989 (following "Shake It Off" and "Blank Space"), making Swift the first artist since Adele to yield three Hot 100 chart toppers from the same album; it is also her fourth consecutive top-10 single from 1989. It also became her 18th top 10 single and Lamar's second (also his first number-one single in the United States)  and the 11th song with the word "Bad" in it to top the Hot 100 chart. It held the top spot for one week, before being replaced by Wiz Khalifa and Charlie Puth's "See You Again". As of July 1, 2015, the song has sold over 1,657,000 million digital copies in the U.S.
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Orleans - Still The One (1976)

Orleans - Still The One (1976)




"Still the One" is a song written by Johanna Hall and John Hall, and recorded by the soft rock group Orleans on their album Waking & Dreaming, released in 1976, which made it to No. 5 on the Billboard Hot 100.

Country singer Bill Anderson recorded and released a successful cover version, peaking at No. 11 on Billboard's Hot Country Singles chart in 1977.

The lyrics of the song are of a man describing his feelings for a woman with whom he has a long lasting and, of course, intimate relationship ("You're still the one, I want to talk to in bed; Still the one that turns my head") and all the reasons why she is "Still the One" for whom he has feelings.

Features of This Track

pop rock qualities
mild rhythmic syncopation
interweaving vocal harmony
extensive vamping
intricate melodic phrasing
demanding instrumental part writing
a clear focus on recording studio production
major key tonality
melodic songwriting
electric guitar riffs
an electric guitar solo
a dynamic male vocalist
electric pianos
romantic lyrics
a mid-tempo swing feel
vocal harmonies
emphasis on instrumental arranging
heavy instrumental improvisation
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The Spinners - Working My Way Back To You (1979)

The Spinners - Working My Way Back To You (1979)





"Working My Way Back to You" is a song made popular by The Four Seasons in 1966 and The Spinners in 1979.

Written by Sandy Linzer and Denny Randell, the song was originally recorded by The Four Seasons in 1966, reaching number nine on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100. In the UK Top 50 chart it spent three weeks - all at No. 50. It is the only hit to feature the group's arranger Charles Calello in the temporary role of bassist/bass vocalist, having replaced original member Nick Massi.

The song is about a man who cheated on his girlfriend and also emotionally abused her. When she leaves, he realizes that he did love her and is very remorseful about his past actions. He vows to win her love back. It is in some ways a re-casting of the melody from their previous hit, "Let's Hang On!".

In 1979 American soul and R&B group The Spinners, or "The Detroit Spinners" in the United Kingdom to avoid confusion with a Liverpool-based folk group of that name, sang a medley of "Working My Way Back to You" and Michael Zager's "Forgive Me Girl," topping the UK Singles Chart for two weeks in April 1980. On the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart, the medley (released the previous November in the U.S.) peaked at the number two position in March for two weeks, behind "Another Brick In The Wall" by Pink Floyd. The Spinners version also made it to number six on the Soul Singles chart and number eight on the disco/dance chart.
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Special of the day: The Archies - Sugar, Sugar (1969)

Special of the day: The Archies - Sugar, Sugar (1969)




"Sugar, Sugar" is a pop song written by Jeff Barry and Andy Kim. It was originally recorded by the Archies, a bubble gum pop band formed by a group of fictional teenagers in the television cartoon series The Archie Show. It reached number one in the US on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in 1969 and stayed there for four weeks. It was also number one on the UK Singles chart in that same year for eight weeks. The song became a hit again in 1970 when R&B and soul singer Wilson Pickett took it back onto the charts.

The Archies' "Sugar, Sugar" was the 1969 number-one single of the year. A week after topping the RPM 100 national singles chart in Canada on September 13, 1969 (where it spent three weeks), it went on to spend four weeks at the top of the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 from September 20 and eight weeks at the top of the UK singles chart. In total, it spent 22 weeks in the Billboard Hot 100. The song lists at number 73 on Billboard's Greatest Songs of All Time. It also peaked at one in the South African Singles Chart. On February 5, 2006, "Sugar, Sugar" was inducted into the Canadian Songwriters Hall of Fame, as co-writer Andy Kim is originally from Montreal, Quebec.

In the United States, "Sugar, Sugar" was classified by the RIAA as a gold record in August 1969, meaning it sold 1 million units (the gold threshold was later lowered to 500,000). The single also topped the 1969 Billboard Year-End chart. "Sugar, Sugar" is listed as the 73rd top hit of all-time in Billboards 55th year anniversary edition
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Supertramp - The Logical Song (1979)

Supertramp - The Logical Song (1979) WLCY Radio Super Seventies




"The Logical Song" is a song by the English rock band Supertramp. The song was released as the lead single from their sixth studio album, Breakfast in America (1979), in March 1979 by A&M Records.

"The Logical Song" is Supertramp's biggest chart hit in both the United States and their native United Kingdom and it is among their most widely recognised radio hits. It won the 1979 Ivor Novello Award for "Best Song Musically and Lyrically".

"The Logical Song" was mostly penned by Roger Hodgson; Rick Davies wrote the vocal harmony on the second chorus. The song makes use of keyboards, castanets, and an instrumental section. Among the contemporary sound effects in this song are the 'tackled' sound from a Mattel electronic football game and the Trouble "Pop-o-matic" bubble – both popular at the time this song was released.

The lyrics are a condemnation of an education system focused on categorical jargon as opposed to knowledge and sensitivity.The lyrics are notable for their use of consonance, with a repetition of the '-ical/ -able' endings of multiple adjectives.

Rolling Stone called the song a "small masterpiece" praising the "hot sax" and Hodgson's "wry humor". The magazine also made comparisons between Hodgson and Ray Davies from The Kinks.
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Michael Martin Murphey - Wildfire (1975)

Michael Martin Murphey - Wildfire (1975) on WLCY Radio Superseventies





"Wildfire" is a classic song written by Michael Martin Murphey and Larry Cansler. It was originally recorded by Murphey, who had yet to add his middle name to his recorded work, and appears on his gold-plus 1975 album Blue Sky – Night Thunder.

Released in February 1975, as the album's lead single, "Wildfire" became Murphey's highest-charting Pop hit in the United States. The somber story song hit #2 in Cash Box and #3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart in June 1975. In addition, it reached the top position of the Billboard Adult Contemporary chart.

The single continued to sell, eventually receiving platinum certification from the RIAA, signifying sales of over two million US copies. Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.
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Willie Nelson - Always On My Mind (1982)

Willie Nelson - Always On My Mind (1982) - WLCY Radio




"Always on My Mind" is an American country music song by Johnny Christopher, Mark James and Wayne Carson, recorded first by Gwen McCrae (as "You Were Always On My Mind") and Brenda Lee in 1972.

Allmusic lists over 300 recorded releases of the song in versions by dozens of performers. While Brenda Lee's version had stalled at #45 on the country charts in 1972, other performers would reach the top 20 in the United States and elsewhere with their own versions: Elvis Presley in 1972; John Wesley Ryles in 1979; Willie Nelson's Grammy Award winning version in 1982; Pet Shop Boys in 1987.

Willie Nelson version

The song was recorded by Willie Nelson and released in the spring of 1982. The song raced to number one on Billboard magazine's Hot Country Singles chart that May, spending two weeks atop and total of 21 weeks on the chart. The song also did very well on Top 40 radio, peaking at number five on the Billboard Hot 100 for three weeks and staying on this chart for 23 weeks. In the year end charts, this version was Billboard's number one country song for 1982. This version also charted in a number of other countries.

Nelson's version would result in three wins at the 25th Grammy Awards in February 1983: songwriters Christopher, James and Carson won Song of the Year and Best Country Song; in addition, Nelson won for Best Male Country Vocal Performance.

This version also won Country Music Association awards in two consecutive years: 1982 Song of the Year and 1983 Song of the Year for songwriters Christopher, James and Carson; 1982 Single of the Year for Nelson, and; contributed to Nelson winning 1982 Album of the Year for the album "Always on My Mind".

Willie Nelson performed the number with Johnny Cash on the 1998 release of VH1 Storytellers: Johnny Cash & Willie Nelson. The song was also featured on a December 2009 ASPCA commercial.

On July 10, 1991, this version was certified platinum by RIAA. In 2008, the single was inducted to the Grammy Hall of Fame.

Nelson's version was prominently featured, in its entirety, in a season two (2013) episode of the HBO television series The Newsroom.
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Dr. Hook - Sharing The Night Together (1978)

WLCY Radio Presents: Dr. Hook - Sharing The Night Together (1978)





Sharing the Night Together is a popular song written by Ava Aldridge and Eddie Struzick. Originally recorded by Lenny LeBlanc and then Arthur Alexander in 1976, the song was later a single by Dr. Hook off their album Pleasure & Pain. "Sharing the Night Together" also appeared on most of Dr. Hook's following albums like Greatest Hits and Greatest Hits (And More). It reached #6 in the U.S. and #3 in Canada in 1978, and #43 in the UK in 1980.

In 1978, Jamaican singer Delroy Wilson made a reggae version.

In 2007, Elliott Yamin covered the song and included it as a bonus track in his eponymous debut album.
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Charlie Rich - The Most Beautiful Girl (1973)

Charlie Rich - The Most Beautiful Girl (1973) WLCY Radio
'70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




"The Most Beautiful Girl" is a song recorded by Charlie Rich and written by Bill Sherrill, Norris Wilson, and Rory Michael Bourke. The country & western ballad reached #1 in the United States in 1973 on three Billboard music charts: the pop chart (two weeks); the country chart (three weeks); and the adult contemporary chart (three weeks), as well as in Canada on three RPM charts: the RPM 100 Top Singles chart, the Country Tracks chart, and the Adult Contemporary chart. Billboard ranked it as the No. 23 song for 1974.

The song is a cover of "Hey Mister", recorded by co-writer Norris Wilson in 1968. The song also uses a part of "Mama McCluskie", also by Norris Wilson.

Rich's B-side, his own I Feel Like Going Home, was later covered by Rita Coolidge and was released on her 1974 album Fall into Spring. British Pop star Engelbert Humperdinck included "The Most Beautiful Girl" on his 1973 album Engelbert: King of Hearts.

"The Most Beautiful Girl" was also recorded by Slim Whitman in the 1970s. Andy Williams released a version in 1974 on his album, The Way We Were. In 1975 ABBA singer Anni-Frid Lyngstad recorded a Swedish-language version called "Vill du låna en man?" (with Swedish lyrics by Stig Anderson) on her solo album "Frida ensam". Sergio Franchi recorded the song in his 1976 DynaHouse album 20 Magnificent Songs. Country music boy band South 65 recorded an updated version of the song, titled "The Most Beautiful Girl (2001 Version)", on their 2001 album Dream Large.

The song receives a very brief airing by Brenda Fricker in the film So I Married an Axe Murderer. Jason Alexander also offered a rendition as his character George Costanza on the Dec. 16, 1992 episode of the sitcom Seinfeld titled "The Pick," where he bemoaned the loss of his girlfriend, Susan.
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Hall & Oates - Kiss On My List (1980)

Hall & Oates - Kiss On My List On voices - WLCY Radio




Kiss on My List is a song by the American duo Hall & Oates. It was written by Daryl Hall and Janna Allen, and produced by the duo. It was the third single release from their ninth studio album, Voices (1980), and became their second Billboard Hot 100 number-one single (after "Rich Girl" in 1977).

While two other songs from the album had returned the duo to chart activity, it was the success of "Kiss on My List" that confirmed the start of the duo's sustained run as one of American pop's top-selling acts, a run that lasted into 1989.

According to Daryl Hall, Eddie Van Halen copied the synth part of this song and used it for the song "Jump" by Van Halen.
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Cat Stevens - Morning Has Broken (1971)

Cat Stevens - Morning Has Broken On Teaser and the Firecat




"Morning Has Broken" is a popular and well-known Christian hymn first published in 1931. It has words by English author Eleanor Farjeon and is set to a traditional Scottish Gaelic tune known as "Bunessan" (it shares this tune with the 19th century Christmas Carol "Child in the Manger"). It is often sung in children's services. English pop musician and folk singer Cat Stevens (known as Yusuf Islam since 1978 after becoming a Muslim in 1977) included a version on his 1971 album Teaser and the Firecat. The song became identified with Stevens when it reached number six on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and number one on the U.S. easy listening chart in 1972.

Writing credit for "Morning Has Broken" has occasionally been erroneously attributed to Cat Stevens, who popularised the song abroad. The familiar piano arrangement on Stevens' recording was composed and performed by Rick Wakeman, a classically trained keyboardist best known for his tenures in the English progressive rock band Yes.

When shaping "Morning Has Broken" for recording, Stevens had to start with a hymn which took around 45 seconds to sing in its basic form. Producer Paul Samwell-Smith told him he could never put something like that on an album, and that it needed to be at least three minutes, although an acoustic demo exists of Stevens playing an early version which lasts almost three minutes. Prior to the actual recording Stevens heard Wakeman play something in the recording booth. It was a rough sketch of what would later become "Catherine Howard". Stevens told Wakeman that he liked it and wanted something similar as the opening section, the closing section and, if possible, a middle section as well. Wakeman told Stevens he could not as it was his piece destined for a solo album, but Stevens persuaded him to adapt his composition. The familiar piano intro and general structure of the piece may be attributed to Stevens or to Wakeman.

In 2000, Wakeman released an instrumental version of "Morning Has Broken" on an album of the same title. That same year he gave an interview on BBC Radio 5 Live in which he said he had agreed to perform on the Cat Stevens track for £10 and was "shattered" to be omitted from the credits, adding that he never received the money either.

On his return to performance as Yusuf Islam, Stevens made a payment to Wakeman and apologized for the original non-payment, which arose from confusion and a misunderstanding on the record label's part. On a documentary aired on British television Wakeman stated that he felt Stevens's version of "Morning Has Broken" was a very beautiful piece of music that had brought people closer to religious truth. He expressed satisfaction in having contributed to this.
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Special Of The Day: The Ronettes - Be My Baby (1963) - One of the greatest pop records ever made

Brian Wilson has declared 'Be My Baby' the greatest pop record ever made







"Be My Baby" is a song written by Jeff Barry, Ellie Greenwich and Phil Spector. It was first recorded and released by American girl group The Ronettes as a single in August 1963 and later placed on their 1964 debut LP Presenting the Fabulous Ronettes featuring Veronica. Spector produced their elaborately layered recording in what is now largely considered the ultimate embodiment of his Wall of Sound production formula.

It is considered one of the best songs of the 1960s by Pitchfork Media, NME and Time. In 2004, the song was ranked 22 by Rolling Stone in its list of The 500 Greatest Songs of All Time and described as a "Rosetta stone for studio pioneers such as the Beatles and Brian Wilson," a notion supported by Allmusic who writes, "No less an authority than Brian Wilson has declared 'Be My Baby' the greatest pop record ever made — no arguments here." In 1999, it was inducted in the Grammy Hall of Fame, and in 2006, the Library of Congress honored the Ronettes' version by adding it to the United States National Recording Registry.

"Be My Baby" was recorded in July of 1963 at Gold Star Studios in Los Angeles. Spector recorded a range of instruments including guitars, saxophones, multiple pianos, and horns with innovative studio mixing and over-dubbing. Spector described his production method as "a Wagnerian approach to rock & roll", which became known as the wall of sound. "Be My Baby" was one of the first times Phil Spector used a full orchestra in his recording. The drums were played by Hal Blaine. Darlene Love and Sonny and Cher were part of the group of guests that provided additional backup vocals. Guitars on the session were played by Tommy Tedesco and Bill Pitman, after whom the instrumental "Tedesco and Pitman" on the B-side of the single was named.

"Be My Baby" was the first Ronettes song produced by Phil Spector released on his label, Philles Records. The group had already recorded a track by Greenwich and Barry called "Why Don't They Let Us Fall in Love", but this was held back in favor of "Be My Baby".

The song was arranged by Spector regular Jack Nitzsche and engineered by Larry Levine. Ronnie Spector is the only Ronette to appear on the record.
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