Chicago - If You Leave Me Now (1976)

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"If You Leave Me Now" is the title of a popular hit ballad by the American rock group Chicago, from their album Chicago X. It was written and sung by bass guitar player Peter Cetera and released as a single on July 31, 1976.

It is also the title of a compilation album released by Columbia Records (Columbia 38590) in 1983.

The single topped the US charts on October 23, 1976, and stayed there for two weeks, making it the first number one hit for the group as well as hitting number one on the Easy Listening charts. It also reached number one in the UK on November 13, 1976, maintaining the position for three weeks.

"If You Leave Me Now" was also Chicago's biggest hit worldwide, topping the charts in other countries such as Australia. It won Grammy Awards for Best Arrangement Accompanying Vocalist(s) and Best Pop Vocal Performance by a Duo, Group or Chorus. In addition, by August 1978 it had sold 1.4 million copies in the United States alone.

The song has been featured in some several television series and movies such as Three Kings, Shaun of the Dead, A Lot Like Love, Sex and the City and the video game Grand Theft Auto V.
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The Doobie Brothers - Listen To The Music (1972)

The Doobie Brothers - Listen To The Music (1972) on WLCY Radio



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"Listen to the Music" is a song recorded by The Doobie Brothers on their second album Toulouse Street. This song was The Doobie Brothers' first big hit in 1972, it remains a concert staple and is one of The Doobie Brothers' biggest hits. This song is usually played as the last song during every one of The Doobie Brothers' concerts.

The studio recording used both a banjo and a prominent flanging effect, audible from the bridge until the fadeout and when released as a single by Warner Bros. Records, the song peaked at #11 on the Billboard Hot 100 in November 1972. Its commercial success helped the album Toulouse Street skyrocket on the charts. The song remains a staple of adult contemporary and classic rock radio. The band also uses it as an encore song during live shows. It was written and sung by guitarist and vocalist Tom Johnston. Patrick Simmons, the second guitarist and vocalist in the group, sings the bridge of the song.
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Creedence Clearwater Revival - Who'll Stop The Rain (1970)

Creedence Clearwater Revival - Who'll Stop The Rain (1970)



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"Who'll Stop the Rain" is a song written by John Fogerty and originally recorded by Creedence Clearwater Revival for their 1970 album Cosmo's Factory. Backed with "Travelin' Band", it was one of three double-sided singles from that album to reach the top five on the Billboard Pop Singles chart and the first of two to reach the #2 spot on the American charts, alongside "Lookin' Out My Back Door". In 2004, Rolling Stone ranked it #188 on its "500 Greatest Songs of All Time" list.
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Gerry Rafferty - Baker Street (1978)

Gerry Rafferty - Baker Street (1978) on WLCY Radio



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"Baker Street" is a song written and first recorded by Scottish singer-songwriter Gerry Rafferty (16 April 1947 – 4 January 2011). Released as a single in 1978, it reached #1 in Cash Box and #2 in Billboard – where it held for six weeks. Additionally, it hit #1 in Canada, #3 in the United Kingdom, #1 in Australia and top 10 in the Netherlands. The arrangement is known for its haunting saxophone solo. Rafferty received the 1978 Ivor Novello award for Best Song Musically and Lyrically.

Named after the London street of the same name, the song was included on Rafferty's second solo album, City to City, which was Rafferty's first release after the resolution of legal problems surrounding the formal break-up of his old band, Stealers Wheel, in 1975. In the intervening three years, Rafferty had been unable to release any material because of disputes about the band's remaining contractual recording obligations.
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Rupert Holmes - Escape (The Pina Colada Song) (1979)

Rupert Holmes - Escape (The Pina Colada Song) (1979) on WLCY Radio



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Escape, also known as "Escape (The Piña Colada Song)", is a song written and recorded by American singer Rupert Holmes for his album Partners in Crime. As the lead single for the album, the pop song was recommended by Billboard for radio broadcasters on September 29, 1979, then added to prominent US radio playlists in October–November. Rising in popularity, the song peaked at the end of December to become the last U.S. number one song of the 1970s.

After its release as a single, the song became immediately popular, though initial sales were slow due to the song's actual title, "Escape", going unnoticed in the place of the oft-repeated cocktail. Holmes reluctantly agreed to rename the song "Escape (The Piña Colada Song)". The song shot up through the charts, becoming the last number-one Billboard Hot 100 hit of 1979.
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Stories - Brother Louie (1973)

Stories - Brother Louie (1973) on WLCY Radio



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Brother Louie is a song about an interracial love affair. The title was written and sung by Errol Brown and Tony Wilson of the group Hot Chocolate, and was a Top 10 hit in the UK Singles Chart for the band in 1973, produced by Mickie Most. Alexis Korner has a spoken word part in this version of the song.

The song was covered by the American band Stories (featuring singer Ian Lloyd) about six months after Hot Chocolate's UK hit, and the Stories version made number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in the US. Another cover was released in 1973 by Roy Ayers on his album Virgo Red, playing vibes instead of singing.

It has since been covered by many other artists including The Undisputed Truth, The Quireboys, Peter Beckett, Louie Louie, Matumbi, The Oppressed, and Scarecrow. Vandenberg singer Bert Heerink had a top 10 hit in 1995 in the Netherlands with a Dutch version titled "Julie July". More recently, the song has been covered by Bon Jovi and the hip hop group Code Red.

The 1986 hit "Brother Louie" by Modern Talking is a different song.
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Shocking Blue - Venus (1969)

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Venus is a 1969 song by the Dutch band Shocking Blue which the group took to number one in nine countries in 1970. In 1986, the British girl group Bananarama returned the song to number one in seven countries.

The composition has been featured in numerous films, television shows and commercials, and covered dozens of times by artists around the world.

Released in late 1969 as a single from the album At Home, Shocking Blue's single reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 7 February 1970. RIAA certification came on 28 January 1970 for selling over one million copies in the U.S., garnering a gold record. Worldwide, the single sold over 7.5 million copies.

The song's lead vocals are performed by Mariska Veres. The song's music and lyrics are written by Robbie van Leeuwen, the band's guitarist, sitarist and background vocalist, who also produced, along with record producer Jerry Ross. Van Leeuwen originally miswrote the line "...the goddess on the mountain top..." as "...the godness on the mountain top...". This was corrected in later versions. Whoever played the Hohner electric piano on the release was not credited.

Van Leeuwen was inspired by "The Banjo Song", a composition by Tim Rose that set Stephen Collins Foster's lyrics to "Oh! Susanna" to a completely new melody.

"Venus" was remixed and re-released by dance producers The BHF (Bisiach Hornbostel Ferrucci) Team in May 1990, scoring the group a Top 10 hit in the UK and Australia 21 years after the release of the original. The remix featured a hip house rhythm and samples. An instrumental version was also released independently under the producer's alias "Don Pablo's Animals". The instrumental version (credited only to Don Pablos Animals – without referencing Shocking Blue) became the highest charting version of the song. The single began with a sample from James Brown's 1988 hit "The Payback Mix (Part One)". This release of "Venus" peaked at #4 on the UK Singles Chart and #8 in Australia in 1990.

The Shocking Blue Mighty Joe Poster
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David Gate - The Goodbye Girl (1977)

David Gate - The Goodbye Girl (1977) on WLCY Radio




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The Goodbye Girl is a single released by David Gates, lead singer of the group Bread, in 1977 following the premiere of the hit movie of the same name. As the theme song to the movie, the song reached number 15 on the Billboard Hot 100 and number 9 on the Cash Box Top 100. It reached number 7 on the Adult Contemporary chart. The song appeared on his studio album Goodbye Girl, released the following year.

In 2004, the alternative rock band Hootie & the Blowfish, released a cover of "The Goodbye Girl" on their compilation album, The Best of Hootie & the Blowfish: 1993–2003. Their version was recorded for the television remake of the original film.
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Free - All Right Now (1970)

Free - All Right Now (1970) On WLCY Radio




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All Right Now is a rock single by the English rock band Free. The song, released in mid-1970, hit #2 on the UK singles chart and #4 on the US Billboard Hot 100 singles chart. "All Right Now" originally appeared on the album Fire and Water, which Free recorded on the Island Records label, formed by Chris Blackwell. In 1991, the song was remixed and re-released, reaching #8 on the UK singles chart.

"All Right Now" was a #1 hit in over 20 territories and was recognised by ASCAP (American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers) in 1990 for garnering 1,000,000 plus radio plays in the U.S. by late 1989. In 2006 the BMI London awards included a Million Air award for 3 million air plays of All Right Now in the USA.

According to drummer Simon Kirke, "All Right Now" was written by bassist Andy Fraser and singer Paul Rodgers in the Durham Students' Union building, Dunelm House.

One of the engineers during the recordings of "All Right Now" was Roy Thomas Baker, who would later become Queen's producer (he mixed "Killer Queen", "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "Don't Stop Me Now" among others).
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Manfred Mann's Earth Band - Blinded By The Light (1977)

Manfred Mann's Earth Band - Blinded By The Light (1977)




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Blinded by the Light is a song written and originally recorded by Bruce Springsteen, although it is mostly known by its 1977 #1 hit version recorded by Manfred Mann's Earth Band. Mann's remake was released in the United Kingdom in August 1976, where it reached No. 6 in the BMRB charts.

Manfred Mann's Earth Band released a version of the song on their album The Roaring Silence. Their version includes the "Chopsticks" melody played on piano near the end of the bridge of the song. The song reached #1 on both Billboard's Hot 100 and on the Canadian RPM chart on 19 February 1977. The Manfred Mann's Earth Band recording of "Blinded by the Light" is Springsteen's only Number 1 single as a songwriter on the Hot 100. In 2002, Danish act Funkstar Deluxe released its disco version of this song. A "jazzified" version can be found on Springsteen's Live in Dublin album, recorded with the Sessions Band.

The song is featured in the films Blow and Running with Scissors.
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Rod Stewart - Da Ya Think I'm Sexy? (1978)

Rod Stewart - Da Ya Think I'm Sexy?
'70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio




Da Ya Think I'm Sexy? is a 1978 song by the British singer Rod Stewart. It is credited as being written by Stewart, Carmine Appice and Duane Hitchings, though it incorporates substantial elements of the melody from a song by Jorge Ben Jor.

The song featured on Stewart's album Blondes Have More Fun, and was released as a single in November 1978. It spent one week at the top of the British charts in December 1978 and four weeks at the top of the US Billboard Hot 100 in February 1979. Billboard ranked it number four on its Top Singles of 1979 year-end chart. It also topped the charts in Australia for two weeks.

Royalties from the song were donated to the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) and Stewart performed the song at the Music for UNICEF Concert at the United Nations General Assembly in January 1979.

Rolling Stone ranked the song at #308 in its list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.
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George McCrae - Rock Your Baby (1974)





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Rock Your Baby is a popular song recorded by George McCrae. Written and produced by Harry Wayne Casey and Richard Finch of KC and the Sunshine Band, "Rock Your Baby" was one of the landmark recordings of early disco music. A massive international hit, the song reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 singles chart in the United States, spending two weeks at the top in July 1974, number one on the R&B singles chart, and repeating the feat on the UK Singles Chart, spending three weeks at the top of the chart in July 1974. Having sold 11 million copies, it is one of the fewer than forty all-time singles to have sold 10 million (or more) physical copies worldwide.

The backing track for the record had been recorded in 45 minutes as a demo, and featured guitarist Jerome Smith of KC and the Sunshine Band. The track was not originally intended for McCrae, but he happened to be in the studio, added a vocal, and the resultant combination of infectious rhythm and falsetto vocals made it a hit.

The chord progression of John Lennon's number one single "Whatever Gets You thru the Night", released a few months later, bears a great resemblance to the one found in "Rock Your Baby". Lennon later admitted to using the song as an inspiration. ABBA's Benny Andersson and Björn Ulvaeus have also cited the song as an inspiration for the backing track of their 1976 smash hit Dancing Queen.
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Bee Gees - Jive Talkin' (1975)

Bee Gees - Jive Talkin' (1975)
'70s #1 Hits on WLCY Radio





Jive Talkin‍ '​ is a song by the Bee Gees, released as a single on 31 May 1975 by RSO Records. This was the lead single from the album Main Course and hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 and reached the top-five on the UK Singles Chart in the summer of 1975. Largely recognised as the group's "comeback" song, it was their first US top-ten hit since "How Can You Mend a Broken Heart" in 1971. The original recording is also notable for its prominent bass-line, which was played on an ARP electronic synthesiser, rather than the usual electric bass.

The song was originally called "Drive Talking". The song's rhythm was modelled after the sound their car made crossing the Julia Tuttle Causeway each day from Biscayne Bay to Criteria Studios in Miami.

Recording for "Jive Talkin'" took place on 30 January and 2 February 1975. The scratchy guitar intro was done by Barry and the funky bass line provided by Maurice Gibb. The finished recording featured a pulsing synthesiser bass line, which was (along with the pioneering work of Stevie Wonder) one of the earliest uses of "synth bass" on a pop recording. It was overdubbed by keyboardist Blue Weaver. using a then state-of-the-art ARP 2600, which producer Arif Mardin had brought in for the recording of the Main Course album. Weaver continues, "Usually Maurice would play bass guitar, but he was away from the studio that night. And when Maurice came back, we let him hear it and suggested he re-record the bass line on his bass guitar". "I really liked the synth bass lines", Maurice said. "I overdubbed certain sections to add bass extra emphasis". "Jive Talkin'" was also influenced by "You're the One" (written by Sly Stone) by Little Sister.
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Barbra Streisand - Evergreen (1976)

Barbra Streisand - Evergreen (1976)



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Evergreen (Love Theme from A Star Is Born) is the theme song from the 1976 film A Star Is Born. It was composed and performed by Barbra Streisand with lyrics by Paul Williams, and arranged by Ian Freebairn-Smith. The song was released on the soundtrack album to A Star Is Born.

As composers, Streisand and Williams earned an Academy Award for Best Original Song. Streisand also earned a Grammy Award for Song of the Year. She and Williams also won Golden Globes for Best Original Song.

The song's opening couplet, "Love, soft as an easy chair, love fresh as the morning air," almost did not appear that way. Williams wrote the morning air line first, but told Streisand to "flip those two first lines, because it sings better."

In the US, the single became Streisand's second number 1 single and spent three weeks at the top of the Billboard Hot 100 and six weeks atop the easy listening chart. This was Streisand's second number-one song on the Hot 100 (following "The Way We Were" in 1974), and her third on the adult contemporary chart ("The Way We Were" and 1964's "People"). It was the 4th Biggest selling song of 1977 according to Billboard, selling more than 2 million copies and certified Platinum. In the UK Singles Chart, the song peaked at #3 in 1977.

In 1997, the track appeared on the tribute album Diana, Princess of Wales: Tribute.
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Tony Orlando and Dawn - Knock Three Times (1971)




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Knock Three Times is a popular song credited to Tony Orlando and Dawn. The actual singers were Tony Orlando, Toni Wine, and Linda November, prior to the creation of "Dawn" with Telma Hopkins and Joyce Vincent Wilson. The song was released as a single in November 1970, paired with Orlando's other hit song, "Candida" (also written by Toni Wine). The single hit number one on the Billboard Hot 100 in January 1971 and eventually sold six million copies, also claiming the number-one spot on the UK Singles Chart. The song registered well at Adult Contemporary stations, reaching #2 on Billboard's "Easy Listening" survey.
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Frankie Valli - Grease (1978)

Frankie Valli - Grease (1978)



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Grease is a song written by Barry Gibb and performed by Frankie Valli. "Grease" is the title song for the musical motion picture Grease, which was based on the stage play of the same name. It was featured twice on the film's soundtrack, as the first track and reprised as the final track.

Barry Gibb wrote a title song to order for the Robert Stigwood film of the stage musical Grease. Since it is heard only in the animated opening credits, it did not need to be recorded before filming. The song was recorded shortly after filming for the 1978 musical film Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band, which was probably when Gibb invited Peter Frampton to the session. Frampton plays guitar on the recording, while Gibb himself provides backing vocals. The other musicians were some of those from the Andy Gibb album that was being made around the same time.

Valli was a falsetto singer, but on this track he sings his natural voice. The film director Randal Kleiser did not like "Grease" and the new song "You’re The One That I Want" because they did not fit the '50s style musically or lyrically. It became a #1 single in the United States in 1978 and also reached #40 on the R&B charts in the same year.

The Bee Gees would later perform the song in their tour One Night Only in 1997 until 1999, and captured on their live offering One Night Only.
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The Doobie Brothers - What A Fool Believes (1979)

The Doobie Brothers - What A Fool Believes (1979)



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What a Fool Believes is a song written by Michael McDonald and Kenny Loggins. The best-known version was recorded by The Doobie Brothers (with McDonald singing lead vocals) for their 1978 album Minute by Minute. Bowing at #73 on 20 January 1979, the single reached number one on the Billboard Hot 100 on 14 April 1979 for one week. The song received Grammy Awards in 1980 for both Song of the Year and Record of the Year.

"What a Fool Believes" was one of the few non-disco No. 1 hits on the Billboard Hot 100 during 1979. The song lyrics tell a story of a man who is reunited with an old love interest and attempts to rekindle a romantic relationship with her before discovering that one never really existed.

Michael Jackson contributed at least one backing track to the original Doobie Brothers recording, but was not credited for having done so.
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K.C. & The Sunshine Band - Keep It Comin' Love (1977)

KC & the Sunshine Band - Keep It Comin' Love (1977)




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Keep It Comin' Love is a 1977 disco song recorded by KC and the Sunshine Band. It appeared on their 1977 album Part 3. The song, like its predecessor "That's the Way (I Like It)", became widely successful due to its sexual double entendres. The song shows the influence of island and Caribbean rhythms.

"Keep It Comin' Love" peaked at no. 2 on the Billboard Hot 100, but made it to number one on the Hot Soul Singles chart. It was also a minor crossover to the Adult Contemporary chart, peaking at no. 36. The song was also an international chart hit, reaching no. 1 in Canada and charting in Australia (no. 28), Belgium (no. 5), the Netherlands (no. 8), New Zealand (no. 19) and the UK (no. 31).
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Shalamar - The Second Time Around (1979)

Shalamar - The Second Time Around (1979)




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The Second Time Around is a 1979 hit by Los Angeles-based R&B group, Shalamar. The song is the first single from their album, Big Fun. The single went to number one on the soul chart and was their most successful hit on the Hot 100 pop chart, reaching number eight in early 1980. "The Second Time Around" also went to number one on the disco/dance chart in January 1980. The song was produced by Leon Sylvers III, who cowrote the song with William Shelby.

In 1980, the band made a promotion of "The Second Time Around" for the radio station KJR in Seattle, called "The Sonics Came to Play," dedicated to the Seattle SuperSonics who had won the NBA Championship the previous year.



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Lipps Inc. - Funkytown Long Version (1980)

Lipps Inc. - Funkytown Long Version (1980)



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Funkytown is a song by American band Lipps Inc., which appears on their 1979 debut album, Mouth to Mouth. It was released as a single in March 1980. Written by Steven Greenberg, the song expresses the singer's pining for a metaphorical place that will "keep me movin', keep me groovin' with some energy".

It was written while the band lived in Minneapolis with dreams of moving to New York. It entered the Billboard Hot 100 on March 29, 1980 and spent four weeks at No. 1, beginning May 31. It also hit No. 1 on the Dance chart in the spring of 1980.

The single held a unique record for reaching number one in 28 countries, more than any other single release until Madonna's "Hung Up" reached number one in 41 countries in 2005. It reached the top spot in the United States, Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Norway, the Netherlands, and Australia, among many others. It also reached No. 2 in the United Kingdom, Sweden, and on the US R&B chart. The song was Lipps Inc's only US Top 40 hit.
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Ambrosia - How Much I Feel (1978)

Ambrosia - How Much I Feel (1978)
How Much I Feel is a 1978 song by American rock band Ambrosia. The song, written by David Pack, was released in the summer of 1978 as the lead single from their third album, Life Beyond L.A., peaking at position three on the Billboard Hot 100 chart and number two for three weeks on the Cash Box Top 100.

The single's B-side, "Ready for Camarillo", was written by Joe Puerta.

Pack also penned the hit singles "Biggest Part of Me" and "You're the Only Woman (You & I)" for the band's 1980 follow-up album, One Eighty.



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"How Much I Feel" is sampled on recording artist Big Sean's single "All Your Fault" featuring Kanye West, the third track on the 2015 album "Dark Sky Paradise."

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